In Monterey Bay, California, scientists grab the chance to study white sharks up close

Growing over six meters (20 feet) long and armed with hundreds of serrated, razor-sharp teeth, white sharks are the world’s largest predatory fish.



a fish swimming under water


© Stanford University


In late summer and fall, up to 250 white sharks congregate in Monterey Bay, off the central Californian coast, to feast on marine mammals — including elephant seals and sea lions — that gather here to breed.

From a shark’s perspective, “think of Monterey Bay as having one of the best fast food restaurants on the planet,” says shark expert and Stanford professor, Barbara Block.

Video: In Monterey Bay, scientists are tagging and tracking white sharks (CNN)

In Monterey Bay, scientists are tagging and tracking white sharks

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Block also travels to Monterey Bay because the annual marine mammal “buffet” offers her an ideal opportunity to study the sharks up close. She and her team lure the “curious” sharks alongside

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The Milky Way and beyond: Scientists publish new data on nearly 2 billion stars

As of today (Dec. 3), scientists have 1.8 billion local stars at their fingertips.

That bounty is thanks to the European Space Agency’s Gaia mission, which has spent 6.5 years tracking stars in our Milky Way galaxy and beyond. Using the spacecraft’s observations, scientists can create a precise 3D map of stars and find patterns playing out across the galaxy.

“Essentially all of astronomy benefits from this one way or another because it’s very fundamental data,” Anthony Brown, an astronomer at the University of Leiden in the Netherlands and chair of the Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium Executive team, told Space.com. “It’s a very, very broad survey mission.”

Related: This 3D color map of 1.7 billion stars in the Milky Way is the best ever made

This image shows the paths of 40,000 stars located within 326 light-years of our Milky Way galaxy over the next 400,000 years
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Tropical reef fish, 81, is the oldest ever discovered by scientists

The octogenarian fish, which is old enough to have lived through World War II, was found by the Australian Institute of Marine Science at the Rowley Shoals, about 300 kilometers (186 miles) west of Broome, as part of a study into the longevity of tropical fish.

Researchers looked at three species they said were not commonly targeted by commercial or recreational fishing in Western Australia and the Chagos Archipelago in the central Indian Ocean. The species included red bass, midnight snapper and black and white snapper.

Long in the tooth: Greenland shark named longest-living vertebrate

The 81-year-old midnight snapper was identified alongside 10 other fish over the age of 60, including a 79-year-old red bass that was also caught in the Rowley Shoals — an area spanning three coral reefs at the edge of Australia’s continental shelf.

Marine scientists determined the age of the fish by dissecting them and studying their ear bones, or otoliths, which contain annual growth

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Puerto Rican scientists, shattered by collapse of Arecibo Observatory, push to rebuild

Génesis Ferrer had dreamed of working in the Arecibo Observatory ever since she first met some of its astrophysicists during a high school trip in Puerto Rico.

After hearing them use terms such as “radiation” and “emission,” Ferrer, 21, said she “just fell in love with the entire idea of being able to understand things so far away.” Like many scientists in the U.S. territory, Ferrer can trace back her interest in astrophysics, biophysics and space to that school trip.

The fourth-year physics student from the University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras campus, had recently earned a fellowship from the Puerto Rico NASA Space Consortium to study emissions from red dwarf stars using the giant radio telescope in Arecibo. Because of coronavirus restrictions, Ferrer has been accessing the data she needs from the Arecibo Observatory remotely, hoping she would soon be able to finish her investigation in the place where

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Scientists reverse age-related vision loss, eye damage from glaucoma in mice — ScienceDaily

Harvard Medical School scientists have successfully restored vision in mice by turning back the clock on aged eye cells in the retina to recapture youthful gene function.

The team’s work, described Dec. 2 in Nature, represents the first demonstration that it may be possible to safely reprogram complex tissues, such as the nerve cells of the eye, to an earlier age.

In addition to resetting the cells’ aging clock, the researchers successfully reversed vision loss in animals with a condition mimicking human glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness around the world.

The achievement represents the first successful attempt to reverse glaucoma-induced vision loss, rather than merely stem its progression, the team said. If replicated through further studies, the approach could pave the way for therapies to promote tissue repair across various organs and reverse aging and age-related diseases in humans.

“Our study demonstrates that it’s possible to safely reverse

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ESRF and UCL scientists awarded Chan Zuckerberg Initiative grant

ESRF and UCL scientists awarded Chan Zuckerberg Initiative grant
for human organ imaging project

The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI) has awarded $1 million to an imaging research project led by three researchers, among them Prof Peter Lee and Rebecca Shipley from UCL (University College London), and ESRF scientist Dr Paul Tafforeau, as part of a world-wide call to advance deep tissue imaging.

The project, named “Anatomical to cellular synchrotron imaging of the whole human body”, promises to develop a transformational X-ray tomography technology that will enable the scanning of a whole human body with unprecedented resolution of 25 microns, thinner than a human hair – tens of times the resolution of a CT scanner. Further, it can then zoom into local areas with cellular-level imaging, or one micron – over 100x better resolution than a CT scanner. This imaging project is based on the recent Extremely Brilliant Source (EBS)

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Scientists are getting closer to figuring out how to synthesize a plant pigment that could have medicinal uses — ScienceDaily

Nagoya University scientists have furthered understanding of how plants make a common pigment that might have medicinal applications. They published their findings in the journal Scientific Reports.

“We studied black soybeans and found a new biosynthetic precursor of the most common anthocyanin in plants,” says Kumi Yoshida of Nagoya University, who led the study and specializes in natural products chemistry.

Anthocyanins are plant pigments with anti-oxidant activities. They are responsible for many of the red through purple to blue colors found in flowers, fruits, vegetables and roots. Scientists are currently researching their medicinal potential for treating metabolic diseases like diabetes and obesity. But so far, anthocyanins can only be extracted from plants. Scientists want to be able to synthesize large amounts of the pure compounds to accelerate research into their potential benefits, which requires understanding how plants make them.

The most common anthocyanin is cyanidin-3-O-glucoside (Cy3G). Scientists

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Scientists discover new species of comb jellies with a high definition video

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) research team discovered a new species of ctenophores commonly called as comb jellies with a remotely operated vehicle (ROV), during an underwater expedition in Puerto Rico.

According to NOAA, this marked as the first-ever identification of a new species using only high-definition video in 2015. Duobrachium Sparksae, newly named, was located two-and-a-half miles below sea level and was acknowledged immediately as a new species.

Mike Ford and Allen Collins were the scientists who recognized the new ctenophore species, and their findings were recently issued in the journal Plankton and Benthos Research.

The study elaborates that the distinctive species has no obvious link within any existing genus or species and it is new to science. Though the video captured is the only evidence, it is described by its distinguishable features from all other known species of Ctenophora and is hypothesized to an origin of

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Scientists warn of the social and environmental risks tied to the energy transition

wind energy
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

To meet the most ambitious 1.5º C climate goal requires a rapid phase-out of fossil fuels and mass use of renewables. However, new international research by the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB) warns that green energy projects can be as socially and environmentally conflictive as fossil fuel projects. While renewable energies are often portrayed as being environmentally sustainable, this new study cautions about the risks associated with the green energy transition, arguing for an integrated approach that redesigns energy systems in favor of social equity and environmental sustainability. The research, which analyzes protests over 649 energy projects, has been recently published in the journal Environmental Research Letters.


The study, authored by an international group of researchers with a large presence of the ICTA-UAB and led by Dr. Leah Temper, from McGill University, draws on data from the

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Scientists map ‘new atlas of the universe’



The new telescope has already mapped a million new galaxies


© CSIRO
The new telescope has already mapped a million new galaxies

Australian scientists say they have mapped a million new galaxies using an advanced telescope in the desert.

The CSIRO, the national science agency, said its new telescope had created “a new atlas of the universe” in record time – showing unprecedented detail.

It mapped three million galaxies in total, with pictures revealing twice the level of detail of previous surveys, the study said.

Astronomers hope the images will lead to new discoveries about the universe.

The CSIRO said the mapping took just 300 hours, whereas previous all-sky surveys had taken years.

With the data publicly available, scientists around the world would be able to study “everything from star formation to how galaxies and their super-massive black hole evolve and interact”, said lead author Dr David McConnell.

“We expect to find tens of millions of new galaxies in future

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