Measuring The Height Of Mount Everest : Short Wave : NPR

Mount Everest, the world’s tallest peak, seen from Syangboche in Nepal.

Prakash Mathema/AFP via Getty Images


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Prakash Mathema/AFP via Getty Images

Mount Everest, the world’s tallest peak, seen from Syangboche in Nepal.

Prakash Mathema/AFP via Getty Images

For three years, Roxanne Vogel trained, single-mindedly, with one number in mind: 29,029 feet.

She slept in a special tent, outside her home in California, that simulated high altitude. She summited dozens of peaks, on nearly every continent. And finally, last year, Vogel climbed up to 29,029 feet in the Himalayan mountains – the top of Mount Everest, the world’s highest peak.

“That’s the closest to heaven, or the closest to outer space, that I will ever get on this Earth,” Vogel, 35, told NPR. “It’s kind of life-changing, when you’re up there.”

Roxanne Vogel, a US mountaineer, atop Everest on May 22, 2019.

Courtesy of Roxanne Vogel


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COVID-19 testing in Mass. is ‘far short’ of levels needed to stop the spread

Another takeaway: A ramped-up testing infrastructure will remain crucial to public health, well after vaccines are widely available.

“It’s not at the pace we would have expected,” said Donna Hochberg, a partner at consultancy Health Advances who leads the firm’s diagnostics practice. “Testing really does help control the pandemic.”

Bain Capital cochair Steve Pagliuca, who leads the tech council’s COVID-19 response and recovery efforts, hosted the event on Monday. The tech council’s main goal is to educate employers and public leaders about the continued need to focus on testing strategies even as the fight against COVID-19 enters a new phase with the arrival of vaccines. In its latest report on the issue, the tech council recommended that federal, state, and local governments develop a systematic, expanded testing regime using multiple kinds of tests and employing public-private partnerships.

Pagliuca, also a co-owner of the Boston Celtics, noted how the number of

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Exploring Bose-Einstein Condensate And Superfluids : Short Wave : NPR

MIT’s Martin Zwierlein works with ultracold atomic gases. Within these glowing clouds of atoms, “superfluid” states of matter form.

Zwierlein Ultracold Quantum Gases Group


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Zwierlein Ultracold Quantum Gases Group

MIT’s Martin Zwierlein works with ultracold atomic gases. Within these glowing clouds of atoms, “superfluid” states of matter form.

Zwierlein Ultracold Quantum Gases Group

Sharpen your pencils. Get out your notebook. Today, we are unveiling a new series called “Back To School.”

In these episodes, we take a concept you were taught in school and go a little deeper with it. Short Wave reporter Emily Kwong and host Maddie Sofia explore OTHER states of matter — beyond solid, liquid, gas, and plasma.

Have you heard of Bose-Einstein condensate? Or superfluids? It’s your lucky day. We speak with Martin Zwierlein, professor of physics at Massachusetts Institute for Technology (MIT), about his work with ultracold quantum gases and observing

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Short Sellers Target Ping An’s Fintech Unit After Ant IPO Fiasco

(Bloomberg) — The headwinds that toppled Ant Group Co.’s initial public offering now threaten a $22 billion dream of China’s Ping An Insurance (Group) Co. — to pivot from a finance group to a tech giant and be valued like one.

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While Ping An’s Lufax Holding Ltd., which offers wealth management and retail lending services, was able to complete its U.S. IPO days before new Chinese rules torpedoed Ant’s $35 billion sale, the stock has given up early gains and is now a target for short sellers. Renewed threats by U.S. regulators to delist Chinese stocks also threaten Ping An’s plans to take more of its in-house startups public.

Ant’s IPO suspension “fundamentally changed near-term investment appetite” for Chinese fintech stocks, with Lufax as “the community’s No. 1 consensus short,” according to a Nov. 5 report from Procensus, which polled 84 global investors managing $15.3 trillion. Short interest

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Microsoft says Xbox Series X might be in short supply until April or beyond

The Xbox Series X and S launched last week, but if you weren’t lucky enough to have a pre-order or snag one of the few launch-day units, you might be waiting until next year — that’s when there might be enough Xbox supply to easily pick up a new console off the shelf, according to a top Xbox exec.

“I think we’ll continue to see supply shortages as we head into the post-holiday quarter, so Microsoft’s Q3, calendar Q1,” said Xbox chief financial officer Tim Stuart at the Jefferies Interactive Entertainment Virtual Conference. (You can read a transcript of Stuart’s full remarks at the conference at Seeking Alpha.)

That’s not an altogether surprising statement, as Xbox chief Phil Spencer tried to set expectations about short supply at the end of October. “We’re gonna have more demand than we do supply,

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Are PS5 Consoles In Short Supply? Gamers Face Battle Buying Sony’s New System

KEY POINTS

  • Retailers such as Target are out of stock
  • The system goes for $499, but is $100 cheaper for a digital-only package
  • Sony didn’t stock shore shelves with PS5s because of the pandemic

Gamers on Thursday got their chance to snatch up the latest iteration from PlayStation but supply-chain issues and the pandemic are making it tough to buy.

Sony announced last week its PlayStation5 would be available to the general public on Nov. 12, and a week later in some regions — just not in stores. Pre-orders were available and some Twitter users suggested they were walking out of stores under the watchful eye of the unfortunate.

“What a year,” Jim Ryan, the president and CEO of Sony Interactive Entertainment, said in a statement Wednesday.

In announcing the launch plans last week, the company said that in the interest of keeping people safe during the pandemic, sales would

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Detection of a short, intense radio burst in Milky Way

Detection of a short, intense radio burst in Milky Way
Artist’s impression of a magnetar in outburst, showing complex magnetic field structureand beamed emission, here imagined as following a crust cracking episode. Credit: McGill University Graphic Design Team

New data from a Canadian-led team of astronomers, including researchers from the McGill Space Institute and McGill University Department of Physics, strongly suggest that magnetars—a type of neutron star believed to have an extremely powerful magnetic field—could be the source of some fast radio bursts (FRBs). Though much research has been done to explain the mysterious phenomenon, their source has thus far remained elusive and the subject of some debate.


First detection of an intense radio burst from a Galactic magnetar

On 28 April 2020, a team of approximately 50 students, postdocs and professors from the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) Fast Radio Burst Collaboration detected an unusually intense radio burst emanating from a nearby magnetar located in the Milky Way.

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TV industry falls short of off-camera inclusivity, study finds

LOS ANGELES — When Zendaya won last month’s Emmy Award for top drama series actress, her triumph seemed to underscore the TV industry’s progress toward inclusivity.

The “Euphoria” star became the second Black winner in the category in five years, following Viola Davis’ drought-ending win for “How to Get Away with Murder” in 2015.

But such success contrasts with the lag in diversity in behind-the-camera jobs and among TV executives as measured by the yardsticks of race and gender, according to a new University of California, Los Angeles, study released Thursday.

“There has been a lot of progress for women and people of color in front of the camera,” Darnell Hunt, dean of the school’s social sciences division and the study’s co-author, said in a statement. “Unfortunately, there has not been the same level of progress behind the camera.”

That’s most notable in Hollywood’s executive suites, where little has changed

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Study: TV industry falls short of off-camera inclusivity

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FILE – In this June 13, 2018 file photo, Channing Dungey arrives at the Women In Film Crystal and Lucy Awards in Beverly Hills, Calif. Dungey has been named chairman, Warner Bros. Television Group, starting her tenure at the studio early next year. The news was announced today by Ann Sarnoff, Chair and CEO, WarnerMedia Studios and Networks Group, to whom she will report. Dungey will succeed Peter Roth who will be stepping down from his Studio responsibilities running the TV Group and its operating divisions in early 2021.

Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

When Zendaya won last month’s Emmy Award for top drama series actress, her triumph seemed to underscore the TV industry’s progress toward inclusivity.

The “Euphoria” star became the second Black winner in the category in five years, following Viola Davis’ drought-ending win for “How to Get Away with Murder” in 2015.

But such success contrasts

Read More

TV industry falls short of off-camera inclusivity

LOS ANGELES (AP) — When Zendaya won last month’s Emmy Award for top drama series actress, her triumph seemed to underscore the TV industry’s progress toward inclusivity.

The “Euphoria” star became the second Black winner in the category in five years, following Viola Davis’ drought-ending win for “How to Get Away with Murder” in 2015.

But such success contrasts with the lag in diversity in behind-the-camera jobs and among TV executives as measured by the yardsticks of race and gender, according to a new University of California, Los Angeles, study released Thursday.

“There has been a lot of progress for women and people of color in front of the camera,” Darnell Hunt, dean of the school’s social sciences division and the study’s co-author, said in a statement. “Unfortunately, there has not been the same level of progress behind the camera.”

That’s most notable in Hollywood’s executive suites, where little has

Read More