Xiaomi official shows off Redmi Note 9 Pro 5G, teases new camera sensor

Redmi 9 device photo 12

Credit: Gary Sims / Android Authority

  • Redmi GM Lu Weibing has shared a render of the new Redmi Note 9 Pro.
  • The phone has four rear cameras, including a brand new sensor.

The new Redmi Note 9 series is launching on November 26 and we’re learning new things about it on a daily basis. The latest bit of information comes from Redmi’s General Manager Lu Weibing who has shared an official render of the purported new Redmi Note 9 Pro 5G. The official has also teased a brand new camera sensor for the series.

The image shared by Weibing (seen below) shows a smartphone with a circular quad camera design and gradient color finish. We previously saw the same phone appear in a blue colorway on the Chinese certification website TENAA.

Redmi Note 9 Pro 5G render

The presence of four rear cameras all but confirms that this is the higher-end Redmi Note 9 Pro. The

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One-of-a-kind fossil shows T. rex and Triceratops locked in battle to the death

When you imagine dinosaurs battling it out, the first match-up that comes to mind is Triceratops vs. T. rex. In our collective imagination they are fighting eternally. It’s the clash of the titans. But did these battles actually take place?



a herd of cattle walking across a river: Artist Anthony Hutchings' rendering of battling Tyrannosaurus rex and Triceratops horridus. Friends of the NC Museum of Natural Sciences


© Provided by CNET
Artist Anthony Hutchings’ rendering of battling Tyrannosaurus rex and Triceratops horridus. Friends of the NC Museum of Natural Sciences

Yes. Yes they did. We have the fossil to prove it, and for the first time ever, the public will be able to take a look.

The fossil — nicknamed “Dueling Dinosaurs” — was initially discovered in 2006, but until now has only been seen by a select few. It shows a T. rex and a Triceratops in mid-battle, literally fighting to the death. The pair are preserved in a fossil going on display for the first time at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, The

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Teardown shows iPhone 12 Pro Max’s enlarged camera module

The latest teardown of the iPhone 12 Pro Max has revealed just how different the camera system is to the one used in the iPhone 12 Pro, with the physically larger sensor and OIS mechanism resulting in a much bigger camera module package.

Following after other customary teardowns of the other iPhone models, the latest examination by iFixit reveals there are still a few differences in the model compared to dismantling the iPhone 12 Pro. The larger body gave Apple the opportunity to do things a little differently, given the extra internal space available to it.

The most important change is with the camera module, which is physically larger than the one found in the iPhone 12 Pro due to Apple changing one of the sensors. The iPhone 12 Pro Max’s wide-angle sensor is 47% larger than in the Pro while remaining the same resolution, allowing the larger

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Incredible fossil shows T. rex and Triceratops locked in battle to the death

When you imagine dinosaurs battling it out, the first match-up that comes to mind is Triceratops vs. T. rex. In our collective imagination they are fighting eternally. It’s the clash of the titans. But did these battles actually take place?



a herd of cattle walking across a river: Artist Anthony Hutchings' rendering of battling Tyrannosaurus rex and Triceratops horridus. Friends of the NC Museum of Natural Sciences


© Provided by CNET
Artist Anthony Hutchings’ rendering of battling Tyrannosaurus rex and Triceratops horridus. Friends of the NC Museum of Natural Sciences

Yes. Yes they did. We have the fossil to prove it and for the first time ever, the public will be able to take a look.

The fossil — nicknamed “Dueling Dinosaurs” — was initially discovered in 2006, but until now has only been seen by a select few. It shows a T. rex and a Triceratops in mid-battle, literally fighting to the death. The pair are preserved in a fossil going on display for the first time at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, The

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MMR vaccine could protect against COVID-19, study shows — ScienceDaily

The measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine has been theorized to provide protection against COVID-19. In a new study published in mBio, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, researchers provide further proof of this by showing that mumps IgG titers, or levels of IgG antibody, are inversely correlated with severity in recovered COVID-19 patients previously vaccinated with the MMR II vaccine produced by Merck. MMR II contains the Edmonston strain of measles, the Jeryl Lynn (B-level) strain of mumps, and the Wistar RA 27/3 strain of rubella.

“We found a statistically significant inverse correlation between mumps titer levels and COVID-19 severity in people under age 42 who have had MMR II vaccinations,” said lead study author Jeffrey E. Gold, president of World Organization, in Watkinsville, Georgia. “This adds to other associations demonstrating that the MMR vaccine may be protective against COVID-19. It also may explain why children have a

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The latest teardown from iFixit shows how huge the iPhone 12 Pro Max camera is

The iPhone 12 Pro Max is Apple’s biggest iPhone ever, with a 6.7-inch display that boasts a camera system our reviewer called “one of the most confident smartphone cameras.” In its latest teardown, iFixit shows how big this impressive camera actually is compared to other iPhones.

The iPhone 12 Pro Max camera is quite large
iFixit

The primary wide-angle sensor “dwarfs the iPhone 12’s sensor,” iFixit says, coming in around 47 percent larger. But it has the same 12 MP resolution as the smaller model. The 12 Pro Max’s sensor-shift image stabilization system— found on most DSLR cameras— adds bulk to the large main camera, iFixit found.

The 12 Pro Max’s L-shaped battery is the largest among all current iPhone models, weighing in at 14.13Wh, compared to the 8.57Wh in the mini and the 10.78 Wh in the 12 and 12 Pro. But iFixit notes that’s actually slightly smaller than

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Research shows test turnaround-time, frequency far more important than sensitivity in curbing spread — ScienceDaily

Testing half the population weekly with inexpensive, rapid-turnaround COVID-19 tests would drive the virus toward elimination within weeks — even if those tests are significantly less sensitive than gold-standard clinical tests, according to a new study published today by University of Colorado Boulder and Harvard University researchers.

Such a strategy could lead to “personalized stay-at-home orders” without shutting down restaurants, bars, retail stores and schools, the authors said.

“Our big picture finding is that, when it comes to public health, it’s better to have a less sensitive test with results today than a more sensitive one with results tomorrow,” said lead author Daniel Larremore, an assistant professor of computer science at CU Boulder. “Rather than telling everyone to stay home so you can be sure that one person who is sick doesn’t spread it, we could give only the contagious people stay-at-home orders so everyone else can go about their

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New study shows impacts of increased levels of evaporative demand as climate grows warmer and drier — ScienceDaily

Climate change and a “thirsty atmosphere” will bring more extreme wildfire danger and multi-year droughts to Nevada and California by the end of this century, according to new research from the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego, and the University of California, Merced.

In a new study published in Earth’s Future, scientists looked at future projections of evaporative demand — a measure of how dry the air is — in California and Nevada through the end of the 21st century. They then examined how changes in evaporative demand would impact the frequency of extreme fire danger and three-year droughts, based on metrics from the Evaporative Demand Drought Index (EDDI) and the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI).

According to their results, climate change projections show consistent future increases in atmospheric evaporative demand (or the “atmospheric thirst”) over California and Nevada.

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Nvidia Shows Volatility After-Hours Despite Q3 Beat

Shares of Nvidia  (NVDA) – Get Report were volatile after hours Wednesday despite the chipmaker reporting October (fiscal third quarter) results that topped analyst estimates for the period. 

TheStreet is live-blogging Nvidia’s Oct. quarter earnings report and call. Please join us!

The Santa Clara-based company reported third quarter revenue of $4.73 billion, a 57% year over year increase, with earnings per share of $2.91. Analysts polled by FactSet were expecting Nvidia to report revenue of $4.41 billion on earnings of $2.57 per share. 

“NVIDIA is firing on all cylinders, achieving record revenues in Gaming, Data Center and overall,” said Jensen Huang, founder and CEO of NVIDIA, in a statement. “The new NVIDIA GeForce RTX GPU provides our largest-ever generational leap and demand is overwhelming. NVIDIA RTX has made ray tracing the new standard in gaming.”

Shares were down 0.2% to $535.95 after-hours Wednesday at last check. 

The company’s

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Study shows amount of time spent on each patient also increased between 32 to 62 percent — ScienceDaily

COVID-19 has, among other things, pushed patients of all ages into greater use of telemedicine to carry out regular doctor visits. A new study being presented at this year’s virtual American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting reveals that “show rates” for children with asthma — how often parents brought their kids to an appointment rather than being a “no show” — increased with the use of telemedicine during four months of the pandemic.

“It would be normal to expect parents to be hesitant to bring kids into an asthma checkup during a pandemic,” says allergist Kenny Kwong, MD, study author. “We run the LAC+USC Breathmobile program (an urban school-based mobile asthma program) in Los Angeles and have regular asthma patients we work with. The pandemic in 2020 resulted in closure of most Los Angeles schools and face to face visits were converted to telemedicine visits.

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