Repurposed mouse model sheds light on loss of smell in COVID-19 — ScienceDaily

A repurposed mouse model can develop symptoms of both severe COVID-19 (lung damage, blood clots, abnormal blood vessels, and death) and also of milder disease, including loss of the sense of smell, according to a recent University of Iowa study published in Nature.

The study also showed that convalescent plasma from a patient who had recovered from COVID-19 protected the mice against lethal disease. The findings suggest the K18-hACE2 mouse model is useful for understanding a spectrum of COVID-19 disease symptoms, and for developing and testing new treatments.

When COVID-19 started spreading across the world earlier this year, UI researchers Stanley Perlman, MD, PhD, and Paul McCray, MD, realized that a mouse model they had created a decade earlier to study SARS might be an invaluable tool for understanding the concerning new disease and for testing potential treatments.

In the new study, Perlman, McCray, and colleagues present a detailed characterization

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The ‘smell’ of coral as an indicator of reef health — ScienceDaily

You might not normally think about what corals smell like — or how the smell changes during heat stress. However, that is what researchers from the University of Technology Sydney (UTS), the University of Sydney and Southern Cross University set out to investigate on the Great Barrier Reef.

Every organism releases a distinct mix of volatile gases that makes up their smell and we are learning that these “smells” can tell us a lot about health. Some individual gases that make up the overall smell even have the ability to influence how an organism copes with stress, and once released from reefs, these gases can affect atmospheric processes.

Despite their importance, these volatile gases have received little attention in tropical coral reefs. This study is the first to explore the overall “smell” of healthy and stressed corals, identifying a distinct chemical diversity.

The research, led by Dr Caitlin Lawson in

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Soccer Star Megan Rapinoe; The Science Of Smell : NPR

Megan Rapinoe celebrates scoring her team’s first goal during the 2019 Women’s World Cup quarter-final match between France and the United States.

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Megan Rapinoe celebrates scoring her team’s first goal during the 2019 Women’s World Cup quarter-final match between France and the United States.

Franck Fife/AFP via Getty Images

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

Soccer Star Megan Rapinoe On Equal Pay, And What The U.S. Flag Means To Her: Rapinoe has also been an outspoken advocate for pay equity and the Black Lives Matter movement. “I see patriotism as constantly demanding better of ourselves,” she says. Her new

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From Cheese To Cat Pee, Author Takes A ‘Nose Dive’ Into The Science Of Smell : Shots

Butyric acid gives some cheeses their distinctively strong scent.

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Butyric acid gives some cheeses their distinctively strong scent.

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Food science writer Harold McGee was in the middle of writing Nose Dive, his book about the science of smell, when he woke up one morning and realized that he couldn’t smell his own coffee.

Loss of smell has since become associated with COVID-19. In McGee’s case, it was the byproduct of a sinus infection. McGee remembers feeling panicked.

“I have friends in the kind of clinical side of taste and smell research. And so I immediately contacted them to find out what I could do and why this had happened,” he says. “And they basically said, ‘You’re going to have to wait and see.’ “

Over the course of a few months, McGee’s sense of smell gradually

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Smell and taste changes provide early indication of COVID-19 community spread — ScienceDaily

Self-reports of smell and taste changes provide earlier markers of the spread of infection of SARS-CoV-2 than current governmental indicators, according to an international team of researchers. The researchers also observed a decline in self-reports of smell and taste changes as early as five days after lockdown enforcement, with faster declines reported in countries that adopted the most stringent lockdown measures.

“In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, many governments have taken drastic measures to prevent their intensive care units from becoming overwhelmed with patients,” said John Hayes, professor of food science, Penn State. “Our research suggests that an increase in the incidence of sudden smell and taste change in the general population may indicate that COVID-19 is spreading. This knowledge could help decision-makers take important measures at the local level, either in catching new outbreaks sooner, or in guiding the relaxation of local lockdowns, given the strong impact of lockdown

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