Chaotic early solar system collisions resembled ‘Asteroids’ arcade game — ScienceDaily

One Friday evening in 1992, a meteorite ended a more than 150 million-mile journey by smashing into the trunk of a red Chevrolet Malibu in Peekskill, New York. The car’s owner reported that the 30-pound remnant of the earliest days of our solar system was still warm and smelled of sulfur.

Nearly 30 years later, a new analysis of that same Peekskill meteorite and 17 others by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, has led to a new hypothesis about how asteroids formed during the early years of the solar system.

The meteorites studied in the research originated from asteroids and serve as natural samples of the space rocks. They indicate that the asteroids formed though violent bombardment and subsequent reassembly, a finding that runs counter to the prevailing idea that the young solar system was a peaceful place.

The study was

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Gaia space telescope measures solar system’s acceleration

Gaia space telescope measures solar system's acceleration
The image shows the apparent motion of 3000 randomly selected, distant quasars caused by the acceleration of our solar system. For each quasar an arrow indicates the direction in which it is accelerated. Note how the motions appear to converge towards a point just below right of the direction to the centre of the Milky Way, which is in the image centre. The background shows Gaia’s all-sky view of our Milky Way Galaxy and neighbouring galaxies, based on the data released in the new EDR3 Gaia catalogue. Credit: ESA/Gaia/DPAC / CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO

The measurement of the acceleration of our solar system by astronomers of TU Dresden is a scientific highlight of the third Gaia catalog, which is now being released. With its publication on December 3, 2020, at 12:00 , the public will have access to high-precision astronomical data, such as positions, velocities, magnitudes and colors of about

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Voyager 1 and 2 detect new kind of solar electron burst

Dec. 3 (UPI) — Data collected by the Voyager spacecraft, Voyager 1 and 2, has revealed a new type of solar electron burst — the satellites’ instruments detected speeding cosmic ray electrons accelerated by shock waves produced by solar eruptions.

The phenomenon was described Thursday in the Astrophysical Journal by a team of physicists led by the University of Iowa.

The Voyager spacecraft were launched in 1977. In 2012, Voyager 1 left the heliosphere and entered interstellar space. Its younger sibling, Voyager 2, escaped the solar system in 2018.

The two probes are now 14 billion miles from the sun, farther than any human-built objects.

While traveling through interstellar space, the two craft observed electrons accelerating along magnetic field lines, some moving 670 times faster than the shock waves that initially triggered their acceleration.

The cosmic burst events were followed by plasma wave oscillations, detected by the same instruments several

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Voyager spacecraft detect new type of solar electron burst

Voyager spacecraft detect new type of solar electron burst
The Voyager spacecraft continue to make discoveries even as they travel through interstellar space. In a new study, University of Iowa physicists report on the Voyagers’ detection of cosmic ray electrons associated with eruptions from the sun–more than 14 billion miles away. Credit: NASA/JPL

More than 40 years since they launched, the Voyager spacecraft are still making discoveries.


In a new study, a team of physicists led by the University of Iowa report the first detection of bursts of cosmic ray electrons accelerated by shock waves originating from major eruptions on the sun. The detection, made by instruments onboard both the Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 spacecraft, occurred as the Voyagers continue their journey outward through interstellar space, thus making them the first craft to record this unique physics in the realm between stars.

These newly detected electron bursts are like an advanced guard accelerated along magnetic field lines in

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Impact of Covid-19 on Solar PV Mounting Systems Market 2020|Future Demands, Growth, Revenue and Forecast 2023

“Market Research Future”

Market Research Future published a research report on “Global Solar PV Mounting Systems Market-Global industry Forecast To 2023” – Market Analysis, Scope, Stake, Progress, Trends and Forecast to 2023.

Market overview

The global solar PV mounting system market shows a lot of prospects with speculations mounting its worth to cross USD 23,100 mn. This feat is all set to be achieved by the year 2023. Through the course, the market is estimated to grow at a CAGR of 11.56% during the forecasted period between 2018 and 2023. With advancing research and growing implementation methodologies, the market looks highly promising all across the globe. Specifically, the rate of deployment of these systems has grown in the recent past.

It is evident that a huge number of companies functional in the energy domain are making massive investments in the solar domain. This is said to be one of the

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Chaotic early solar system collisions resembled ‘asteroids’ arcade game

Chaotic early solar system collisions resembled 'asteroids' arcade game
A cross-polarized image of the Artracoona meteorite under 50 times magnification. Credit: Michael Lucas.

One Friday evening in 1992, a meteorite ended a more than 150 million-mile journey by smashing into the trunk of a red Chevrolet Malibu in Peekskill, New York. The car’s owner reported that the 30-pound remnant of the earliest days of our solar system was still warm and smelled of sulfur.


Nearly 30 years later, a new analysis of that same Peekskill meteorite and 17 others by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, has led to a new hypothesis about how asteroids formed during the early years of the solar system.

The meteorites studied in the research originated from asteroids and serve as natural samples of the space rocks. They indicate that the asteroids formed though violent bombardment and subsequent reassembly, a finding that runs counter to the

Read More

Powerhome Solar faces new complaints from frustrated customers

Powerhome Solar, which is among the nation’s fastest-growing energy firms, is facing complaints from customers about performing sloppy installations and providing poor customer service that’s left some of them stuck with expensive panels that they say don’t work.

The allegations, made by 11 customers who spoke with Business Insider, follow our previous investigation into Powerhome. That story reported that the company appears to use misleading sales tactics to sell high-priced rooftop solar panels and was based on a review of legal records, interviews with a dozen current and former employees, and internal memos.

Read more: Fast-growing energy firm Powerhome Solar uses misleading tactics to lure customers into home solar deals that cost more than a car, insiders, legal claims, and leaked memos suggest

Customers we spoke with for this story say they experienced problems with Powerhome Solar that extend beyond the company’s sales practices.

One customer said he thinks that

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Aurora Solar raises $50 million to streamline solar installation with predictive algorithms

San Francisco-based Aurora Solar, which taps a combination of lidar sensor data, computer-assisted design, and computer vision to streamline solar panel installations, today announced a $50 million raise. The company says it will leverage the funds to accelerate hiring across all teams and ramp up development of new features and services for solar installers and solar sales consultants.

Despite recent setbacks, solar remains a bright spot in the still-emerging renewable energy sector. In the U.S., the solar market is projected to top $22.9 billion by 2025, driven by falling materials costs and growing interest in offsite and rooftop installations. Moreover, in China — the world’s leading installer of solar panels and the largest producer of photovoltaic power — 1.84% of the total electricity generated in the country two years ago came from solar.

Aurora Solar

Above: Modeling solar panel installations with Aurora Solar’s software.

Image Credit: Aurora Solar

Stanford University graduates Samuel

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Solar power stations in space could help save the planet

Solar-space-station.Getty Images

The UK government is considering a plan to build mile-wide solar power stations in space that can send beams of energy back down to Earth.

The plans involve five huge stations floating 24,000 miles above the planet, each weighing several thousand tonnes – that’s heavier than 20 blue whales, the world’s largest animal!

Each solar power station would be made from tens of thousands of smaller pieces, needing 200 separate rocket launches to send the pieces into space, where they will be put together by robots.

If this all sounds very futuristic, that’s because it is. It’s hoped the stations will generate 15 per cent of the country’s electricity supply by the year 2050, that’s enough power for four million UK homes.

Speaking about the plans, government science minister Amanda Solloway said: “Solar space stations may sound like science fiction, but they could be a game-changing new source

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DIO additives contribute to efficiency of polymer solar cells

DIO Additives Contribute to Efficiency of Polymer Solar Cells
A schematic of ultrafast interfacial excitons dynamics in the P51:PC71BM blend after photoexcitation. Credit: SIOM

Recently, researchers from the Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have made progress in ultrafast dynamics of polymer solar cells (PSCs) with Soochow University.

The research team used femtosecond transient absorption technology to study active layer of organic solar cells, explaining the contribution of 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO) additives to the efficiency enhancement of PSCs. The results have been published in Nanomaterials.

As a new type of solar cell device, PSCs have the advantages of light weight, mechanical flexibility and low-cost fabrication. But low efficiency is the main limit of its large-scale application.

The research team studied the effect of DIO additives on photocarrier generation in donor materials (P51) and bulk heterojunction films (P51:PC71BM) by pump-probe measurement.

They found that the introduction of DIO additives could improve the

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