New gelatinous ‘blob’ species discovered in the depths of the ocean

Scientists have discovered a new blob-like species of ctenophore, or comb jelly, off Puerto Rico.

The creature, named Duobrachium sparksae, was first spotted during a 2015 dive led by the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research.

An undersea drone captured high-definition video of the comb jelly during the dive. “NOAA Fisheries scientists Mike Ford and Allen Collins, working shoreside, spotted it and recognized it as novel,” said NOAA, in a statement. “This marks the first time NOAA scientists exclusively used high-definition video to describe and annotate a new creature.”

The discovery, which follows years of analysis, is described in the journal Plankton and Benthos Research.

STUNNING VOLCANIC ‘LOST WORLD’ DISCOVERED DEEP IN THE OCEAN

However, no physical samples of the comb jellyfish have been taken. “It’s unique because we were able to describe a new species based entirely on high-definition video,” said Collins, in the statement. “The cameras on

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Scientists discover new species of comb jellies with a high definition video

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) research team discovered a new species of ctenophores commonly called as comb jellies with a remotely operated vehicle (ROV), during an underwater expedition in Puerto Rico.

According to NOAA, this marked as the first-ever identification of a new species using only high-definition video in 2015. Duobrachium Sparksae, newly named, was located two-and-a-half miles below sea level and was acknowledged immediately as a new species.

Mike Ford and Allen Collins were the scientists who recognized the new ctenophore species, and their findings were recently issued in the journal Plankton and Benthos Research.

The study elaborates that the distinctive species has no obvious link within any existing genus or species and it is new to science. Though the video captured is the only evidence, it is described by its distinguishable features from all other known species of Ctenophora and is hypothesized to an origin of

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This alien-looking creature is actually a new species of jelly



a close up of a fish: new jellyfish


© Provided by BGR
new jellyfish

  • An entirely new species of jelly was discovered using high-definition video during an expedition back in 2015.
  • The creature was able to be classified as a new species thanks to the high resolution of the video, which allowed scientists to describe it in great detail.
  • There are over 150 species of comb jelly in Earth’s oceans.

If the image above looks like some kind of strange alien creature from another world, well, that’s because it sort of is. It’s from Earth, of course, but as far as science was concerned, this weird little blob didn’t even exist until a recent expedition discovered it cruising around at an absolutely crushing depth.

The creature is an entirely new species of comb jelly, which is a relative of the jellyfish we see closer to the surface. The only difference is that this mysterious jelly lives at depths

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Guam’s most endangered tree species reveals universal biological concept

Guam's most endangered tree species reveals universal biological concept
University of Guam Research Associate Benjamin Deloso examines a bi-pinnately compound leaf of Guam’s flame tree. The endangered Serianthes nelsonii tree makes a leaf that uses this same design. Credit: University of Guam

Newly published research carried out at the University of Guam has used a critically endangered species to show how trees modify leaf function to best exploit prevailing light conditions. The findings revealed numerous leaf traits that change depending on the light levels during leaf construction.


“The list of ways a leaf can modify its shape and structure is lengthy, and past research has not adequately looked at that entire list,” said Benjamin Deloso, lead author of the study. The results appear in the October issue of the journal Biology.

Terrestrial plants are unable to move after they find their permanent home, so they employ methods to maximize their growth potential under prevailing conditions by modifying their

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Guam’s most endangered tree species reveals universal biological concept — ScienceDaily

Newly published research carried out at the University of Guam has used a critically endangered species to show how trees modify leaf function to best exploit prevailing light conditions. The findings revealed numerous leaf traits that change depending on the light levels during leaf construction.

“The list of ways a leaf can modify its shape and structure is lengthy, and past research has not adequately looked at that entire list,” said Benjamin Deloso, lead author of the study.

Terrestrial plants are unable to move after they find their permanent home, so they employ methods to maximize their growth potential under prevailing conditions by modifying their structure and behavior. The environmental factor that has been most studied in this line of botany research is the availability of light, as many trees begin their life in deep shade but eventually grow tall to position their leaves in full sun when they are

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NOAA scientists discover a new species of a gelatinous animal in the waters near Puerto Rico

Scientists have discovered a new species of ctenophore, or comb jelly, near Puerto Rico.



a fish swimming under water: This type of comb jelly, or ctenophore, was first seen during a 2015 underwater expedition by a NOAA research team.


© NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research
This type of comb jelly, or ctenophore, was first seen during a 2015 underwater expedition by a NOAA research team.

The newly named Duobrachium sparksae was discovered two and a half miles below sea level by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries research team. It was found during an underwater expedition using a remotely operated vehicle in 2015 and filmed by a high-definition camera.

NOAA Fisheries scientists Mike Ford and Allen Collins spotted the ctenophore and recognized it as a new species. This is the first time NOAA scientists have identified a new species using only high-definition video, according to NOAA.

“The cameras on the Deep Discoverer robot are able to get high-resolution images and measure structures less than a millimeter. We don’t have the same

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A new species of rare phylum Loricifera discovered in the deep-sea surrounding Japan — ScienceDaily

The Loricifera is a microscopic, sediment-dwelling marine invertebrate, with a head covered in over 200 spines and an abdomen with a protective shell — known as a lorica. Since it was first discovered in 1983, just under 40 species have been written about. Now, that number is one more thanks to a group of scientists who reported on a new genus and species of Loricifera.

Their findings were published in the Journal Marine Biodiversity.

“Loricifera is a rare animal that is still under-researched, but our recent finding improves our understanding of the species’ diversity,” said lead author Shinta Fujimoto.

Loricifera typically inhabit the space between sand and mud particles in the ocean. Fossils exist from the Cambrian period, suggesting a long existence on Earth. They have complicated life cycles and a few species are reported to live in anoxic environments. Their exact position on the animal tree of life

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Understanding traditional Chinese medicine can help protect species — ScienceDaily

Demystifying traditional Chinese medicine for conservationists could be the key to better protecting endangered species like pangolins, tigers and rhino, according to University of Queensland-led researchers.

UQ PhD candidate Hubert Cheung said efforts to shift entrenched values and beliefs about Chinese medicine are not achieving conservation gains in the short term.

He said a better understanding of traditional practices was critical for conservationists to form more effective strategies.

“The use of endangered species in traditional Chinese medicine threatens species’ survival and is a challenge for conservationists,” Mr Cheung said.

“Pushing messages of inefficacy, providing various forms of scientific evidence or promoting biomedical alternatives doesn’t seem to be drastically influencing decisions and behaviours.

“And, although many practices and treatments continue to be criticised for lacking scientific support, the World Health Organization approved the inclusion of traditional Chinese medicine in its global compendium of medical practices last year.

“The challenge now is

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The world’s newest monkey species was found in a lab, not on an expedition

The discovery of the Popa langur, a medium-sized leaf-eating monkey found in central Myanmar, was recently announced by scientists. It is estimated there are just 200 to 250 of these monkeys, which will likely mean the new species is classed as “critically endangered.” This find was announced just a week or so after two new species of greater glider – a gliding marsupial – were identified in Australia. But what do scientists mean when they announce the discovery of “new” mammalian species? Were these animals really unknown to science?



a monkey sitting on a tree branch: The Popa langur (Trachypithecus popa) is named after the sacred Mount Popa, which holds the largest population of the species with just over 100 animals.


© Provided by Live Science
The Popa langur (Trachypithecus popa) is named after the sacred Mount Popa, which holds the largest population of the species with just over 100 animals.

While discoveries such as the langur and the gliders are certainly exciting, it is important to clarify that these were not previously unseen species uncovered by some intrepid explorer. Rather, these

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Jaguars robust to climate extremes but lack of food threatens species

jaguar
Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain

A new QUT-led study has found wild jaguars in the Amazon can cope with climate extremes in the short-term, but numbers will rapidly decline if weather events increase in frequency, diminishing sources of food.


Distinguished Professor Kerrie Mengersen and Professor Kevin Burrage led a team of researchers in a world-first investigation of the big cat’s chances of survival.

The new research results have been published in Ecology and Evolution.

The jaguar (Panthera onca) is the dominant predator in Central and South America and is considered a near-threatened species by the International Union Conservation Nature.

Research main points:

  • Results are concerning for future viability of jaguar populations in Peruvian Amazon.
  • Stochastic statistical temporal model of jaguar abundance considers six population scenarios and estimates of prey species.
  • Jaguar diet includes white lipped peccary, collared peccary, red brochet deer, white tailed deer, agouti, paca and armadillo.
  • Species exhibit
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