Amazon workers stage Black Friday protests in 15 countries

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Amazon has hired hundreds of thousands of new workers to handle the spike in consumer demand. 


Declan McCullagh/CNET
For the most up-to-date news and information about the coronavirus pandemic, visit the WHO website.

A day after Amazon said it will give a holiday bonus to its front-line employees — those most at risk of contracting the coronavirus —  warehouse workers in multiple countries staged strikes and protests on Black Friday.

Full-time employees in the US from Dec. 1 to 31 are eligible for the $300 bonus, Dave Clark, Amazon’s senior vice president of retail operations, said Thursday in a company blog post. Part-time workers in the US employed during the same period will receive a $150 bonus, he said.

“Our teams are doing amazing work serving customers’

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How NASA and Apple tech provider Liquid Instruments took their products to the global stage



Daniel Shaddock et al. sitting on a bench in front of a laptop: liquid instruments


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liquid instruments

Liquid Instruments was founded in Canberra by a team of experimental physicists and engineers, including former researchers from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Their equipment helps scientists, engineers, students and professionals seamlessly acquire data, run measurements and control their experiments.

“We started Liquid Instruments because we were frustrated with current test and measurement equipment and realised that a new approach based on a different technology could really make a difference,” says Liquid Instruments CEO Professor Daniel Shaddock.

The company’s flagship product, Moku:Lab, integrates 12 precision test and measurement instruments into a single, compact hardware device.  



a man and a woman looking at a laptop


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The company’s flagship product, Moku:Lab.

To replicate all that Moku:Lab can deliver would require tens of thousands of dollars in separate equipment purchases and significantly more lab space to house it all. 

Liquid Instruments began making Moku:Labs in a small storeroom at the Australian

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With a little help from science, musicians at the Houston Symphony made their return to the stage

The Houston Symphony has become the blueprint for symphonies across the U.S, as they’ve mastered how to properly social distance for live shows.

Previously the popular orchestra canceled live shows and moved to live-streaming.

SYMPHONY GOES VIRTUAL: Houston Symphony at the vanguard of live-streaming

After months of shutdowns, the company resumed weekly performances at Jones Hall back in July.

With the help from researchers at Rice University, the symphony found a solution to resuming live performances. Rice researchers used high-speed cameras to measure airflow around musicians and their instruments.


The findings from this study coincide with other coronavirus recommendations from the CDC and WHO—social distancing and wearing masks is effective.

In interview with KHOU’s Stephanie Whitfield, Rice University engineering professor Ashok Veeraraghaven explained how tiny “microparticles” are the cause of spread from performers to a larger room.

“Microparticles tend to rise up as soon as they come out of

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Welcome launches to help companies stage Apple keynote-style virtual events

Welcome is throwing its hat into the virtual events ring today, further evidence that the global pandemic may leave an indelible mark on the trillion-dollar business event and conference market.

Welcome emerges from stealth after just seven months in development and three months testing with beta customers. Welcome CEO and cofounder Roberto Ortiz said the company aims to allow anyone to “throw an experience that feels like an Apple keynote.”

“We saw that there was a big gap in the market, especially looking at high-end events, high-end experiences, and high-end production,” Ortiz told VentureBeat.

In the run-up to its public launch, Welcome has secured $12 million in funding from notable investors that include Kleiner Perkins, Y Combinator, Kapor Capital, and WIN (Webb Investor Network).

The likes of Apple, Alphabet, Microsoft, and other companies with endless resources may find the transition to online events relatively painless — but for those without

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Upper stage issue causes Arianespace launch failure, costing 2 satellites

images of people in clean suits standing near metal hardware.
Enlarge / Technicians lower one of the doomed satellites into the Vega’s payload hardware.

An overnight launch of Arianespace’s Vega rocket failed after reaching space, costing France and Spain an Earth-observing satellite each. The failure represents the second in two years after Vega had built up a spotless record over its first six years of service.

The Vega is designed for relatively small satellites, typically handling total weights in the area of about 1,000 kilograms, though it can lift heavier items into lower orbits or take lighter ones higher. The trip to space is powered by a stack of three solid rocket stages; once in space, a reignitable liquid-fueled rocket can perform multiple burns that take payloads to specific orbits.

Vega had started off with a flawless launch record, averaging about two a year for its first six years of service before a solid booster failure caused the first loss

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‘Don’t count out technology,’ even as value stocks start to stage a comeback, says Oppenheimer’s strategy chief

  • With positive COVID-19 vaccine news lifting value stocks related to the reopening trade, technology stocks have underperformed.
  • In fact, since September 23, value stocks have outperformed growth stocks across all market cap segments, according to a Monday note from Oppenheimer.
  • Technology investors should stay calm, as the underperformance of growth stocks over the past couple months likely has to do with a potential tax-hike under a Biden administration, the note said.
  • “Interest rates are likely to remain low for the intermediate term suggesting that growth will retain its attraction for investors,” Oppenheimer’s Chief Investment Strategist John Stoltzfus said.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Value stocks have staged a comeback over the past two months as investors bet that beaten down cyclical shares will surge on an economic reopening.

The outperformance in value stocks relative to growth stocks has become more pronounced over the past week, with

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Dark sky sets the stage for meteors, planets and constellations

The new moon occurs on Sunday, Nov. 15, at 12:07 a.m. EST (0507 GMT), just two days before the Leonid meteor shower reaches its peak. Without any moonlight to pollute the view, skywatchers may see some meteors in the night sky. Jupiter, Saturn and Mars will reign in the evening sky, while Mercury and Venus will make a special appearance before dawn the next day.



a close up of a bowl: This illustration (made using real images and data) shows the moon in shadow during the "new moon" lunar phase.


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This illustration (made using real images and data) shows the moon in shadow during the “new moon” lunar phase.

New moons occur when the moon is between the sun and Earth. About every 29.5 days the two bodies are lined up in the sky along the same line of celestial longitude. Celestial longitude is a projection of the Earth’s longitude lines on the celestial sphere; when two bodies share the same longitude that is called a conjunction. If one draws a

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Shifts in water temperatures affect eating habits of larval tuna at critical life stage — ScienceDaily

Small shifts in ocean temperature can have significant effects on the eating habits of blackfin tuna during the larval stage of development, when finding food and growing quickly are critical to long-term survival, a new study from Oregon State University researchers has found.

In a year of warmer water conditions, larval blackfin tuna ate less and grew more slowly, in part because fewer prey were available, compared to the previous year, when water conditions were one to two degrees Celsius cooler, the researchers found.

The findings provide new insight into the relationship between larval tuna growth and environmental conditions, as well as the broader impacts of climate change on marine fish populations. As the climate continues to warm, over the long term, increasing water temperatures may interact with changing food webs to pose critical problems for fish populations, the researchers said.

“There was a drastic difference in the fish between

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Turbulent environment set the stage for leaps in human evolution 320,000 years ago

People thrive all across the globe, at every temperature, altitude and landscape. How did human beings become so successful at adapting to whatever environment we wind up in? Human origins researchers like me are interested in how this quintessential human trait, adaptability, evolved.



a field with a mountain in the background: Drilling 139 meters down to volcanic rock provided scientists with a million-year environmental record.


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Drilling 139 meters down to volcanic rock provided scientists with a million-year environmental record.

At a site in Kenya, my colleagues and I have been working on this puzzle for decades. It’s a place where we see big changes happening in the archaeological and fossil records hundreds of thousands of years ago. But what external factors drove the emergence of behaviors that typify how our species, Homo sapiens, interacts with its surroundings?

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We wanted to know if we could connect what was happening in the environment at the time to these shifts in technology and the human species that

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Turbulent environment set the stage for leaps in human evolution and technology 320,000 years ago

<span class="caption">Drilling 139 meters down to volcanic rock provided scientists with a million-year environmental record. </span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Human Origins Program, Smithsonian</span></span>
Drilling 139 meters down to volcanic rock provided scientists with a million-year environmental record. Human Origins Program, Smithsonian

People thrive all across the globe, at every temperature, altitude and landscape. How did human beings become so successful at adapting to whatever environment we wind up in? Human origins researchers like me are interested in how this quintessential human trait, adaptability, evolved.

At a site in Kenya, my colleagues and I have been working on this puzzle for decades. It’s a place where we see big changes happening in the archaeological and fossil records hundreds of thousands of years ago. But what external factors drove the emergence of behaviors that typify how our species, Homo sapiens, interacts with its surroundings?

We wanted to know if we could connect what was happening in the environment at the time to these shifts in technology and the human species that lived there. Based

Read More