Facebook could face a state antitrust lawsuit as soon as next week

Facebook Chairman and CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies at a House Financial Services Committee hearing in Washington, October 23, 2019.

Erin Scott | Reuters

State attorneys general are preparing to file an antitrust lawsuit against Facebook as soon as next week, sources familiar with the matter told CNBC’s Ylan Mui. At least 20 to 30 states could join in, the sources said.

The news comes as multiple outlets have reported the Federal Trade Commission is likely to file its own antitrust lawsuit against the social media giant. It’s still unclear where the FTC may choose to bring a case — either in federal court or before its administrative law judge. If it chooses to bring the case in-house, it cannot combine its lawsuit with the states. Reuters previously reported the states were planning an antitrust case against Facebook.

Both the FTC and the state AGs, led by New York’s Letitia James,

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Washington state ranks No. 2 nationwide for annual video game industry economic output at $11.6B

(Halo Infinite Photo)

Washington state’s video games industry overtook Texas last year and claimed the No. 2 spot for total economic output as the U.S. video game industry grew to new heights yet again.

Those are two takeaways from a new report published by the Entertainment Software Association (ESA), the games industry’s trade organization in the U.S.

In Washington state, the local games industry represents 48,808 jobs, with an economic output of $11.6 billion. This puts it ahead of all other states besides California, which has an effectively insurmountable lead. A little over half of all game development nationwide is done in California, which accounts for $51 billion of the more than $90 billion in economic output generated nationwide in 2019.

The ESA defines economic output as “the total value of the goods and services produced in the economy.”

Washington has been an important overall part of the U.S. games

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Georgia Tech, NC State look to continue 2020 recoveries

The Wolfpack won only one conference game in 2019. N.C. State’s winning streak includes a win over then-No. 21 Liberty on Nov. 22 and last week’s 36-29 win at Syracuse.

It has been a rewarding season for eighth-year N.C. State coach Dave Doeren.

Doeren says the Wolfpack learned from last year’s overall 4-8 season. The last-place finish in the ACC’s Atlantic Division at 1-7 raised questions about the direction of Doeren’s program.

“To go from one ACC win to wherever we end up … that’s pretty damn good,” Doeren said.

An offense installed by new coordinator Tim Beck has provided a jolt even after losing starting quarterback Devin Leary to a leg injury.

“It’s a been a fun year,” Doeren said. “It’s a special group. And obviously if we can get this next one and put us at eight (wins), that would make it even better.

“But going into the

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Massachusetts on the verge of becoming first state to ban police use of facial recognition

Massachusetts lawmakers this week voted to ban the use of facial recognition by law enforcement and public agencies in a sweeping police reform bill that received significant bipartisan support. If signed into law, Massachusetts would become the first state to fully ban the technology, following bans barring the use of facial recognition in police body cameras and other, more limited city-specific bans on the tech.



a close up of a map


© Illustration by Alex Castro / Th


The bill, S.2963, marks yet another state government tackling the thorny ethical issue of unregulated facial recognition use in the absence of any federal guidance from Congress. It also includes bans on chokeholds and rubber bullets in addition to restrictions on tear gas and other crowd-control weapons, as reported by TechCrunch. It isn’t a blanket ban on facial recognition; police will still be able to run searches against the state’s driver’s license database but only with a

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‘Trust the science,’ until the science doesn’t support the nanny state

After some bureaucrats decided that strip clubs can be open while schools can’t and that bars and restaurants can be open although churches can’t, unelected bureaucrats are now contemplating changing the definition of “moderate drinking” for men from two drinks to one. I don’t know if this government intervention is worth taking up our pitchforks and storming the Capitol over, but it at least makes it extremely clear that our government is taking its role as a nanny state seriously. The hard part is stopping this overreach.



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Let’s take a closer look at this proposed change to see just how severe the problem is.

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Every five years, the Department of Health and Human Services publishes new dietary guidelines. With the next update due in December, the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee has published its recommendations. Ever since the introduction of guidelines in 1980, the

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Washington state launches COVID-19 exposure notification app using Google and Apple technology

Images of the Android interface for the WA Notify app being released Monday.

Washington state unveiled a new app to inform residents if they’ve been exposed to someone diagnosed with COVID-19, as infection rates in the state soar to an average of 2,700 cases a day.

WA Notify, announced Monday morning, is a free app that uses technology developed through a joint effort by Apple and Google called the Exposure Notification System. The app takes advantage of low-energy Bluetooth signals emitted by smartphones to detect and remember interactions, allowing people to be notified if they’ve been in proximity to someone who later tests positive for COVID. It does not collect any personal information to identify app users or track their movements.

“It rapidly gets the information out to people who were close contacts to watch for symptoms, to make them aware of testing opportunities, to self-quarantine and if they’re infected,

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Ohio State back at full football practices

The Latest on the effects of the coronavirus outbreak on sports around the world:

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The Ohio State football team is resuming full practices again in preparation for Saturday’s game at Michigan State.

Ohio State said in a one-sentence statement that the team would “resume organized team activities” on Tuesday afternoon.

The Buckeyes will do so while managing COVID-19 issues, and will be without coach Ryan Day, who tested positive last week. Defensive line coach Larry Johnson is assuming head coaching duties for the week and for Saturday’s game in East Lansing.

Ohio State chose to cancel its game at Illinois last week because of an unacceptable number of COVID cases among players and staff in the program.

No. 3 Ohio State (4-0, CFP No. 4) needs to play this week and next week against Michigan to have enough games in to be eligible for the Big Ten title.

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The Latest: Boise State says its resuming football practice | College Sports

Georgia wound up opening the season Sunday with an 85-75 win over Florida A&M, another game that was arranged on short notice after a contest against Gardner-Webb was canceled because of coronavirus concerns.

Northern Arizona’s two-game basketball series with Eastern Washington this weekend has been pushed back due to COVID-19 concerns.

The Lumberjacks and Eagles were slated to play Thursday and Saturday in Flagstaff. Those games will now be played Dec. 18-19.

Northern Arizona’s opening game against Arizona last Wednesday was canceled due to a positive test with the Lumberjacks’ program.

Michigan coach Jim Harbaugh says team meetings that were scheduled to be done in person will be conducted virtually on Monday after an increased number of presumptive positive COVID-19 tests.

Harbaugh says the decision was made “out of an abundance of caution,” by medical professionals, athletic department staff, athletic trainers and doctors.

The Wolverines (2-4) are scheduled to play

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The FTC and state attorneys general are reportedly aiming up to 4 new antitrust lawsuits at Facebook and Google as talk of regulation continues to heat up



a close up of Sundar Pichai wearing glasses and looking at the camera: Carsten Koall/Getty Images; Alex Wong/Getty Images


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Carsten Koall/Getty Images; Alex Wong/Getty Images

  • The Federal Trade Commission and state attorneys general are gearing up to hit Google and Facebook with new antitrust lawsuits in the coming weeks, per a Monday report from The Wall Street Journal.
  • The probes will focus on whether the companies have had unfair advantages in their domination of the search and ad market and social media.
  • The DOJ and state attorneys generals have been probing aspects of Google’s business, including its search, online advertising, and Android practices, since 2019. The DOJ filed an antitrust lawsuit against Google in October.
  • But if the government sued Facebook, it would be the first major US government antitrust action taken against the social media company.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Federal and state officials are gearing up to slap Facebook and Google with up to four new antitrust lawsuits by

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Tech Antitrust During Biden, ADR for Copyright Small Claims and Cybersecurity in State and Local Governments

This week in Washington IP news, Senate committees will convene a series of business meetings, including one by the Senate Judiciary Committee to look at a proposed bill that would create an alternative dispute resolution (ADR) pathway for resolving copyright small claims. The Senate Environment Committee will also discuss a proposed legislative draft designed to restore American dominance in nuclear energy in part by supporting the licensing of advanced nuclear energy technologies. Elsewhere, the Brookings Institution will host a pair of events exploring the impacts of smart machines on the American labor force as well as the future of antitrust policy in the tech sector during the Biden Administration.

Tuesday, December 1 

Brookings Institution 

The Future of Tech Antitrust in the Biden Administration

At 11:00 AM on Tuesday, online video webinar.

In the United States and around the world, especially in Europe, government antitrust regulators have honed their focus onto

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