DermaScan Continues to Drive Safety Technology in the United States Market During the Coronavirus Pandemic

Press release content from Accesswire. The AP news staff was not involved in its creation.

DENVER, CO / ACCESSWIRE / December 4, 2020 / DermaScan’s temperature screening technology in the US has become an essential and effective tool for government and businesses relying on in-person operations during the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020.

With experts recognizing fever being one of the indicating symptoms of the virus, temperature checks are becoming a standard in proactive measures in minimizing risk exposure. In early 2020, DermaScan’s focus changed towards temperature screening hardware and software that, through unique infrared technology, can operate independently or integrate with other devices, such as security doors, which has been a proactive measure in states where ordinances are consistently changing officials say.

“Consistent temperature screenings are as reliable as oral thermometer readings, yet quicker in results and more sanitary to keep traffic in motion while safe,”

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More States Launch COVID Apps


States across the country continue to launch apps that are aimed at alerting residents via their smartphones when they’ve come into contact with others who are positive for COVID-19.

The latest state to do so was Washington, which launched its statewide COVID-19 exposure app, WA Notify, Nov. 30. With the launch of this app, Washington joins a growing list that includes Michigan, Colorado, Delaware and others. All of these apps are relatively simple, and they function much the same way: they are anonymous, no-cost and voluntary, asking users to submit positive test results into apps, subsequently sending alerts to anyone who may have been in their proximity. The number of states now offering this to residents has topped a dozen, with more states — specifically Oregon and California — poised to join the list soon.

In addition to more states launching these apps, download rates are also increasing in many

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Despite development slowdown, the state’s life science industry keeps on building

From the industry’s traditional hub in Cambridge’s Kendall Square to emerging hot spots in Fort Point and the Fenway to vast campuses in more distant locations such as the former Fort Devens, life science companies are launching a wide array of projects, fueled by investors attracted to a fast-growing industry.

“There’s just tremendous interest in investing in these sort of projects,” said John Bonnano, chief investment officer at IQHQ, a real estate firm that’s launching two major life science developments here, and earlier this month closed on a $1.7 billion fund to finance more in Boston, San Francisco, and San Diego. “There’s an awful lot of capital out there right now.”

It’s chasing a market that has only become stronger relative to other real estate sectors. Traditional office tenants now occupy about 3 million fewer square feet of space across Greater Boston than they did at the start of the

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Facebook Faces Antitrust Lawsuit From as Many as 40 U.S. States

A group of U.S. states led by New York is investigating Facebook  (FB) – Get Report for potential antitrust violations, with plans to file a lawsuit against the social media giant.

Citing four sources familiar with the situation, Reuters reported that more than 40 states are behind the lawsuit, which is expected to be filed as soon as next week.

Facebook and other tech giants including Amazon.com  (AMZN) – Get Report, Apple  (AAPL) – Get Report and Alphabet-owned Google  (GOOGL) – Get Report have been accused of using their size and reach to direct consumers to their own products and services, stifling competition in the process.

Specifically, federal and state antitrust authorities are probing whether Facebook is taking advantage of its size and platforms in search and advertising practices – in particular through third-party platforms it owns like Instagram and WhatsApp.

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New York, other states, to sue Facebook next week

By Diane Bartz and Karen Freifeld | Reuters

WASHINGTON – A group of U.S. states led by New York is investigating Facebook Inc for possible antitrust violations and plans to file a lawsuit against the social media giant next week, four sources familiar with the matter said on Wednesday.

The complaint would be the second major lawsuit filed against a Big Tech company this year. The Justice Department sued Alphabet Inc’s Google in October.

More than 40 states plan to sign on to the lawsuit, one source said, without naming them.

Facebook declined to comment. A spokesman for the New York attorney general’s office declined to comment.

The Federal Trade Commission, whose commissioners met on Wednesday, could file a related complaint with an administrative law judge or in district court.

It is not known what the states plan to include in their complaint. One allegation often made against Facebook is

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United States Department of Defense Information Technology Report 2020-2025: Industry Convergence Propels the Industry – Press Release

Dublin, Nov. 30, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The “Industry Convergence Propels US Department of Defense Information Technology, 2020-2025” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering.

This research service focuses on the US Department of Defense (DoD) information technology (IT) budget requests and representative contracts. Analyses of research, development, test, and evaluation (RDT&E); procurement; operations and maintenance (O&M); and a variety of other services are also presented in this study. Contract activity for the 2019 calendar year is also included.

The DoD IT 2021 budget request consists of the Army, Navy/Marine Corps, Air Force, and joint service spending plans (all of which are included). The base year for financial spending is 2019, and the market forecast is from 2020 to 2025.

IT spending for the fiscal year 2021 DoD budget request is the foundation of this research. The 2021 DoD request may encounter opposition from both sides of the political aisle.

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Two distinctly different liquid states of water — ScienceDaily

Using X-ray lasers, researchers at Stockholm University have been able to follow the transformation between two distinct different liquid states of water, both being made of H2O molecules. At around -63 Centigrade the two liquids exist at different pressure regimes with a density difference of 20%. By rapidly varying the pressure before the sample could freeze, it was possible to observe one liquid changing into the other in real time. Their findings are published in the journal Science.

Water, both common and necessary for life on Earth, behaves very strangely in comparison with other substances. How water’s properties such as density, specific heat, viscosity and compressibility respond to changes in pressure and temperature is completely opposite to other liquids that we know. Consequently, water is often called “anomalous.” If water would have behaved as a “normal liquid” we would not exist, since marine life could not have developed. However,

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Prop 22 should influence states to provide benefits to gig-workers

  • Californians across the political spectrum voted to pass Proposition 22, affirming the importance of flexible work and the need to include new benefits and protections for gig-workers.
  • It is time to push forward, focused on better, permanent, collaborative solutions for millions of workers across the country.
  • Tony Xu is the co-founder and CEO of DoorDash.
  • This is an opinion column. The thoughts expressed are those of the author.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

2020 has been a year of enormous upheaval. So many of the decisions we faced have been incredibly consequential, shaping the kind of future we want for this country. In one of those decisions, voters in California chose to embrace a new future for work in a decision that has taken on even greater importance in light of our nation’s present challenges.

By passing Proposition 22 with 58% of the vote, Californians affirmed the importance

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Comcast sets data caps for D.C., Northeast states

Comcast initially responded to this trend by giving people relief from data caps, which have already been in place across the central and western U.S. for a few years. That reprieve ended in July, and now the company is expanding its controversial data thresholds to the new region starting next year.

Comcast Xfinity customers in New York, Virginia, Maryland and 11 other northeastern states, plus D.C., will be able to use up to 1.2 terabytes of data each month before they start getting charged more, regardless of what speed plan they use. After that, data will be charged at $10 for 50 gigabytes, up to a maximum of $100 additional each month.

Comcast says with that much data, you could stream five hours of 4K video every day for a month, or take part in 3,500 hours of video conferencing.

“I would think that companies should never be implementing nickel-and-diming

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The Technology 202: Four reasons why covid exposure apps haven’t taken off in the United States yet

But these apps are most effective when more people join them — and to date, the United States has had a scattered rollout of the technology. But there is early research abroad indicating that the technology can play a role in limiting the spread of the virus. 

Here are four reasons that coronavirus exposure apps haven’t taken off yet here:

1. There’s a patchwork of different systems in the United States. 

The federal government hasn’t rolled out a single exposure notification system for the whole country, so Americans instead have to rely on a patchwork of different state and local apps. As of Nov. 20, 15 U.S. states and territories, plus D.C., supported coronavirus exposure alerts. Geoffrey made a helpful guide allowing you to check if it’s available in your state, and turn on the notifications.

Several large states have also announced their intent to launch exposure notification technology or

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