Private spies reportedly infiltrated an Amazon strike, secretly taking photos of workers, trade unionists, and journalists. Now a union is taking legal action.



a person wearing sunglasses and standing in a parking lot: November 2018: An Amazon worker with a mask of Amazon founder Jeff Bezos posing during a strike on Black Friday in the main logistic center protesting demanding better working conditions. Marcos del Mazo/LightRocket via Getty Images


© Marcos del Mazo/LightRocket via Getty Images
November 2018: An Amazon worker with a mask of Amazon founder Jeff Bezos posing during a strike on Black Friday in the main logistic center protesting demanding better working conditions. Marcos del Mazo/LightRocket via Getty Images

  • Private spies sub-contracted by the infamous Pinkerton Agency, a firm Amazon employs, infiltrated and photographed a worker strike at a warehouse on Black Friday 2019, according to a Spanish media report.
  • The spies compiled a 51-page document, which included photos of trade unionists, workers, and journalists who attended the strike, Spanish news site El Diario reported.
  • Amazon has used Pinkerton spies to track warehouse workers and labor movements at the company in the past, according to a November report.
  • Spanish labor union CCOO has asked a judge to seize documentation relating to the report ahead of potential legal action against Amazon. An Amazon spokesperson told El Diario
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Plant viruses hijack the defense system of plants, but there might be a way to strike back — ScienceDaily

Many diseases caused by common plant viruses reduce the crops of important food plants. In the worst case, potato viruses, among others, can destroy as much as 80% of crops on infected fields.

Plants are not entirely defenceless against viruses, although they lack an immune system like the one found in humans. For plant cells, the primary defence mechanism against viral infections is gene silencing. By utilising the mechanism, plant cells identify the foreign genetic material originating in the virus and cut it up into small pieces.

“In turn, these bits of the genome guide plant cell proteins to identify and destroy viral genomes. As a result, the production of viral proteins ends, which is interpreted as ‘silencing’ of the viral genes. A successful defensive response prevents the virus from spreading in the plant,” says Docent Kristiina Mäkinen from the Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, University of Helsinki.

Viruses can

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