Study revealing the secret behind a key cellular process refutes biology textbooks

RNA
A hairpin loop from a pre-mRNA. Highlighted are the nucleobases (green) and the ribose-phosphate backbone (blue). Note that this is a single strand of RNA that folds back upon itself. Credit: Vossman/ Wikipedia

New research has identified and described a cellular process that, despite what textbooks say, has remained elusive to scientists until now—precisely how the copying of genetic material that, once started, is properly turned off.


The finding concerns a key process essential to life: the transcription phase of gene expression, which enables cells to live and do their jobs.

During transcription, an enzyme called RNA polymerase wraps itself around the double helix of DNA, using one strand to match nucleotides to make a copy of genetic material—resulting in a newly synthesized strand of RNA that breaks off when transcription is complete. That RNA enables production of proteins, which are essential to all life and perform most of the

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New Research Study From Pega

We have seen more change in the past ten months than we have in the past ten years.

Even prior to COVID-19 and Black Lives Matter, organizations around the world were having to adapt to things like AI & technology advancements, globalization, the changing nature of talent, and just the overall pace of change we are all experiencing.

I wrote about these trends in an article called: 140 Top CEOs Say These Are The 6 Trends Leaders Must Pay Attention To.

Over the past few months I’ve been working with Pega (paid client) who recently put out The Future of Work Report which is based on a survey of over 3,000 senior managers and frontline IT staff. The findings were quite interesting.

When COVID-19 struck many organizations around the world were caught off-guard.

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When I wrote my book, The Future Leader, I was very much focused on the next

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New study explains important cause of fatal influenza — ScienceDaily

It is largely unknown why influenza infections lead to an increased risk of bacterial pneumonia. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have now described important findings leading to so-called superinfections, which claim many lives around the world every year. The study is published in the journal PNAS, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and can also contribute to research on COVID-19.

The Spanish Flu was an influenza pandemic that swept across the world in 1918-20 and unlike many other pandemics disproportionately hit young otherwise healthy adults. One important reason for this was so-called superinfections caused by bacteria, in particular pneumococci.

Influenza is caused by a virus, but the most common cause of death is secondary bacterial pneumonia rather than the influenza virus per se. Pneumococcal infections are the most common cause of community-acquired pneumonia and a leading global cause of death. A prior influenza virus infection sensitizes

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Genetic study shows that the risk of pre-eclampsia is related to blood pressure and BMI — ScienceDaily

Pre-eclampsia, usually diagnosed by increased blood pressure and protein in urine, affects up to 5% of pregnant women. It contributes worldwide to the death of estimated 50 000 women and up to one million babies annually. The condition is also associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases among mothers and their children later in life. There is an inherited risk, with women with a family history of pre-eclampsia at greater risk of developing the condition themselves.

In the InterPregGen study, researchers from the UK, Iceland, Finland, Norway, Denmark, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan studied how maternal genetic variation influences the risk of pre-eclampsia. The team studied the genetic make-up of 9,515 pre-eclamptic women and 157,719 control individuals.

The results, reported today in Nature Communications, pinpointed DNA variants in the ZNF831 and FTO genes as risk factors for pre-eclampsia. These genes have previously been associated with blood pressure, and the FTO

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Novel imaging technology offers new way to study baby brain activity

A team of UK scientists and engineers has demonstrated a novel technology for imaging the brains of infants and babies. The breakthrough is hoped to allow researchers new ways to investigate baby brain activity in natural environments without the need for expensive MRI machines.

“There is a lot we still don’t know about how the brain develops, and a big part of the problem is that studying the infant brain is really difficult with traditional scanners,” explains Rob Cooper lead on the project from University College London. “As any parent knows, 6-month old babies are very active; they move around all the time and are easily distracted. Using a technique like MRI, the subject has to remain completely still, which is almost impossible with babies unless they are asleep or sedated.”

The system presented in the study, published in the journal NeuroImage, is a new generation of wearable caps

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Climate change may increase drownings as ice thins, study finds

Falling through ice and drowning is a perennial risk in northern communities where winter ice is a defining part of the environment. But to Leary, the four-wheeler accident stuck out as an especially harrowing one, in part because of its timing: It occurred in late March 2019, a time of year when the Kuskokwim River, which runs through Bethel, should be frozen solid and safe for locals to use as a highway to drive from place to place.

“I thought to myself as I was [going] out there — this shouldn’t be happening,” Leary said in an interview. “We should have at least another month of safe travel on river ice.”

Far from an isolated incident, Leary’s experience reflects a reality facing northern communities around the world: As winters grow warmer because of climate change, seasonal lake, river and sea ice is becoming treacherous. Now, a new study is warning

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Enzymatic photocaging for the study of gene regulation through DNA methylation — ScienceDaily

The addition and removal of methyl groups on DNA plays an important role in gene regulation. In order to study these mechanisms more precisely, a German team has developed a new method by which specific methylation sites can be blocked and then unblocked at a precise time through irradiation with light (photocaging). As reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the required regent is produced enzymatically, in situ.

Although they look very different and serve completely different functions, all cells in our body have identical DNA. However, they do not use the same genes. Certain genes are turned on and others off, depending on the type of cell and the moment in time. The “switches” are chemical changes in the building blocks of the DNA. These changes are called epigenetic modifications. One significant regulation mechanism is methylation and demethylation, meaning the attachment and removal of a methyl group (-CH(3)). The

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A breakthrough in the study of stellar nurseries — ScienceDaily

The gas clouds in which stars are born and evolve are vast regions of the Universe that are extremely rich in matter, and hence in physical processes. All these processes are intertwined on different size and time scales, making it almost impossible to fully understand such stellar nurseries. However, the scientists in the ORION-B* programme have now shown that statistics and artificial intelligence can help to break down the barriers still standing in the way of astrophysicists.

With the aim of providing the most detailed analysis yet of the Orion molecular cloud, one of the star-forming regions nearest the Earth, the ORION-B team included in its ranks scientists specialising in massive data processing. This enabled them to develop novel methods based on statistical learning and machine learning to study observations of the cloud made at 240,000 frequencies of light**.

Based on artificial intelligence algorithms, these tools make it possible to

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Global Game Camera Market Size 2020 Trend and Opportunities, Market Share, Analysis, CAGR and Value Chain Study, Showing Impressive Growth by 2024

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Nov 23, 2020 (The Expresswire) —
2020 Game Camera Market :- A game camera, often referred to as “trail camera”, is a tough, motion-activated camera designed to take photos and videos of wildlife and security surveillance, and game camera is comprised of a motion detector and a digital camera. The motion detector uses passive infrared technology to sense movement and trigger the camera., However, Exactness a marketing and sales strategy for the new offering

Game Camera Market provides detailed analysis of Market Overview, SWOT analysis, Game Camera Researching competitor offerings, Drivers, Maximum Countries Data, Prospects, and Potential Application. Also Game Camera Industry research report includes the future impact of major drivers and challenges and, support decision makers in manufacture cost-effective professional decisions. According to Investigator global market for Game Camera is expected to grow at a CAGR

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Deep Space Might Not Be Completely Dark, New Study Suggests

When we look out at the darkest night skies available on Earth, even the emptiest abyss we can find isn’t completely dark. We can look between the individual stars in the Milky Way, seeing out into the Universe beyond. We can look at the space between the myriad of galaxies populating the Universe, finding many regions without identifiable light sources of any type. But even when we do, the light from our own backyard still gets in

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