Researchers successfully track ‘bottle tags’ through Ganges River system into Bay of Bengal — ScienceDaily

A new study demonstrates the potential for plastic bottles tagged with tracking devices to deepen our understanding of how plastic pollution moves through rivers. Emily Duncan of the University of Exeter, U.K., and colleagues present this research in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on Dec 2, 2020.

Plastic pollution threatens natural ecosystems and human health worldwide. Previous research suggests that rivers transport up to 80 percent of the plastic pollution found in oceans. However, while ocean modeling and tracking technology have revealed detailed insights into how plastic litter moves and accumulates within oceans, river transport of plastic pollution remains poorly understood.

To help address this knowledge gap, Duncan and colleagues developed a new, low-cost, open-source tracking method that uses reclaimed 500 mL plastic bottles to house custom-designed electronics, allowing the bottles to be tracked via GPS cellular networks and satellite technology. These “bottle tags” mimic plastic beverage bottles, in the

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China’s Chang’e-5 spacecraft successfully lands on the moon to retrieve lunar rocks and soil

Chinese state media reported Tuesday that the probe “successfully landed” at its targeted site, an area called Oceanus Procellarum. China did not immediately announce any other details about the landing.

On the lunar surface, the probe is expected to dig about seven feet deep, collecting as much as 4.5 pounds of rocks and lunar soil into the ascent vehicle, which would then meet up with the service capsule in lunar orbit and return to Earth.

Once the material is back on Earth, scientists would be able to calculate its age and examine it to determine its composition.

On Twitter, Thomas Zurbuchen, NASA’s associate administrator for the science mission directorate, congratulated China. “This is no easy task,” he wrote. “When the samples collected on the Moon are returned to Earth, we hope everyone will benefit from being able to study this precious cargo that could advance the international science community.”

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China says spacecraft successfully lands on moon for historic sample collection

The Chinese government says a robot probe launched to return lunar rocks to Earth has landed on the moon. The official China News Service said the Chang’e 5 “successfully landed on the moon in the pre-selected landing area.” It gave no more details.

The probe adds to a string of increasingly ambitious missions by a Chinese space program that aims eventually to land a human on the moon.

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This animation released by China Central Television (CCTV) shows Chang’e-5 probe flying to moon.

CCTV via Reuters


The spacecraft is expected to collect about 4 pounds of rock and soil samples, and return them to Earth for laboratory analysis.

If successful, the Chang’e 5 mission will make China only the third nation, after the United States and the former Soviet Union, to bring moon rocks back to Earth.

The Chang’e 5 flight is China’s third successful lunar landing. Its predecessor, Chang’e 4,

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Developer Successfully Virtualizes Windows for Arm on M1 Mac

Developer Alexander Graf has successfully virtualized the Arm version of Windows on an M1 Mac, proving that the M1 chip is capable of running Microsoft’s operating system (via The 8-Bit).

windows 10

Currently, Macs with the M1 chip do not support Windows and there is no Boot Camp feature as there is on Intel Macs, but support for Windows is a feature that many users would like to see.

Using the open-source QEMU virtualizer, Graf was able to virtualize the Arm version of Windows on Apple’s M1 chip, with no emulation. Since the M1 chip is a custom Arm SoC, it is no longer possible to install the x86 version of Windows or x86 Windows apps using Boot Camp, as was the case with previous Intel-based Macs. However, he said in a Tweet that when virtualized on an M1 Mac, “Windows ARM64 can run x86 applications really well. It’s not as

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The UAE has successfully launched the Arab world’s first Mars mission

The United Arab Emirates successfully launched its Mars-bound Hope Probe on Sunday, marking the the Arab world’s first interplanetary mission — and the first of three international missions to the Red Planet this summer.



a satellite in space


© MBRSC


The Hope Probe took off from the Tanegashima Space Center in Japan, after a delay last week due to bad weather. The solid rocket booster successfully separated from the launch vehicle, and the probe has established two-way communication with the ground segment in Dubai.

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The Al Amal probe, as it is called in Arabic, is expected to reach Mars by February 2021. It will be the first time the UAE has orbited Mars, and the probe will stay in orbit for a Martian year — equivalent to 687 days on Earth — to gather data about Mars’ atmosphere.

“It’s an honor to be part of the global efforts to explore deep space,”

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Rocket Lab successfully brings its rocket back to Earth underneath a parachute

After launching one of its rockets to orbit on Thursday, small satellite launcher Rocket Lab successfully brought the vehicle back to Earth and landed it gently in the ocean underneath a series of parachutes. The maneuver was part of an intricate dress rehearsal, meant to practice nearly all of the steps Rocket Lab will take to recover and reuse its rockets in the future.

Rocket Lab’s primary rocket is the Electron, aimed at launching batches of small satellites into low Earth orbit. For all of the company’s 15 launches up until now, the Electron has been expendable, with an entirely new rocket used for each new mission. But in 2019, Rocket Lab announced its plans to try to save the majority of the Electron rocket following future launches, in order to reuse the vehicles for subsequent missions. And the company has been slowly progressing toward that goal ever since, testing

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United Launch Alliance Successfully Launches NROL-101 Mission in Support of National Security

A United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket carrying the NROL-101 mission for the National Reconnaissance Office lifts off from Space Launch Complex-41 at 5:32 p.m. EST on Nov. 13, 2020. Photo Credit: United Launch Alliance
A United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket carrying the NROL-101 mission for the National Reconnaissance Office lifts off from Space Launch Complex-41 at 5:32 p.m. EST on Nov. 13, 2020. Photo Credit: United Launch Alliance
A United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket carrying the NROL-101 mission for the National Reconnaissance Office lifts off from Space Launch Complex-41 at 5:32 p.m. EST on Nov. 13, 2020. Photo Credit: United Launch Alliance
A United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket carrying the NROL-101 mission for the National Reconnaissance Office lifts off from Space Launch Complex-41 at 5:32 p.m. EST on Nov. 13, 2020. Photo Credit: United Launch Alliance
A United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket carrying the NROL-101 mission for the National Reconnaissance Office lifts off from Space Launch Complex-41 at 5:32 p.m. EST on Nov. 13, 2020. Photo Credit: United Launch Alliance
A United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket carrying the NROL-101 mission for the National Reconnaissance Office lifts off from Space Launch Complex-41 at 5:32 p.m. EST on Nov. 13, 2020. Photo Credit: United Launch Alliance

Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla.,

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NASA’s OSIRIS-REx Probe Successfully Stows Space-Rock Sample

NASA’s pioneering OSIRIS-REx probe has bagged up its precious asteroid sample for return to Earth.

OSIRIS-REx has finished stowing the bits of the carbon-rich asteroid Bennu that it snagged last Tuesday (Oct. 20), successfully locking the material into the spacecraft’s return capsule, mission team members announced Thursday (Oct. 29).

And the sample appears to be substantial—far heftier than the 2.1 ounces (60 grams) the mission had set as a target, team members said. Indeed, OSIRIS-REx collected so much material on Oct. 20 that its sampling head couldn’t close properly; the head’s sealing mylar flap was wedged open in places by protruding Bennu pebbles.

The OSIRIS-REx team noticed that issue last week when examining photos of the head and its collected sample; flakes of escaped asteroid material drifted through the frames. To minimize the amount lost, the team decided to expedite the precise and complex stowing procedure, which was supposed to

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Asteroid samples successfully sealed in capsule to return to Earth, NASA says

An estimated two pounds or more of rock and soil collected from the asteroid Bennu by NASA’s OSIRIS-REx spacecraft have been successfully sealed up in a protective re-entry capsule for return to Earth in 2023, project managers said Thursday.

While detailed hands-on analysis cannot begin until the samples are returned, scientists have already gained insights into the flaky nature of Bennu’s soil, or regolith, by watching how it behaved when the rocks and soil were collected on October 20.

And that is already feeding into discussions about how to possibly one day divert a threatening asteroid from a collision with Earth.

“The OSIRIS-REx mission has collected a phenomenal data set about asteroid Bennu, which is a potentially hazardous asteroid with approximately (a) 1-in-2,700 chance of impacting the Earth late in the 22nd century,” said Dante Lauretta, the mission’s principal investigator.

“The biggest uncertainties on the mission where the response of

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NASA Successfully Scoops up a Sample From Asteroid Bennu

NASA has succeeded in collecting a sample from an asteroid for the first time, scooping up rocks and dust from asteroid Bennu using its OSIRIS-REx spacecraft.

The OSIRIS-REx spacecraft successfully touched down on asteroid Bennu on Tuesday, October 20, marking the first time that NASA has touched an asteroid in this manner. During the touchdown, the spacecraft fired a burst of nitrogen gas down toward the asteroid in order to throw up soil and small rocks which were to be collected by the probe’s Touch-And-Go Sample Acquisition Mechanism (TAGSAM) head. The aim was to collect at least 2 ounces (60 grams) to sample.

The NASA team had to wait a few days to learn if this sample collection had been successful. And now the news has come in, and it looks good — at least 2 ounces have been scooped up.

There’s a slight challenge though. When looking at images

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