Amazon’s cloud unit taps own chips for new supercomputing offering

Dec 1 (Reuters) – Amazon.com Inc’s cloud unit on Tuesday offered a new supercomputing service based on its self-designed processors, a further sign of how chips based on Arm Ltd’s technology are encroaching on Intel Corp and Advanced Micro Devices Inc turf.

Amazon Web Services, or AWS, sells its computing services based on the customer’s choice of an underlying central processor chip. Software developers have traditionally chosen between Intel or AMD products, but since 2018 Amazon has also offered its own “Graviton” chips designed with technology from Arm, which is in the midst of a $40 billion takeover by Nvidia Corp.

Arm-based chips have long powered mobile phones because they can operate on very low power levels, but they are increasingly used in data centers where their power efficiency helps control costs. The world’s fastest computing system, the Fugaku supercomputer in Japan, is based on Arm chips.

Supercomputing helps with

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NASA Research Exhibit to Highlight Science and Engineering Advances at the Virtual SC20 Supercomputing Conference

NASA Research Exhibit to Highlight Science and Engineering Advances at the Virtual SC20 Supercomputing Conference

PR Newswire

WASHINGTON, Nov. 16, 2020

WASHINGTON, Nov. 16, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — From assessing COVID-19’s global impacts to helping NASA return humans to the Moon to searching the cosmos for new exoplanets, researchers from across NASA, with university and industry partners, will highlight their latest advances, enabled by the agency’s supercomputers, in the NASA research exhibit at SC20—the International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis. This year, the conference is being held virtually November 9 through 19, 2020.

NASA Logo. (PRNewsFoto/NASA) (PRNewsFoto/) (PRNewsfoto/NASA)
NASA Logo. (PRNewsFoto/NASA) (PRNewsFoto/) (PRNewsfoto/NASA)

The virtual NASA exhibit will feature 35 science and engineering projects for which HPC plays an essential role.

This year, as a participant in the national COVID-19 High Performance Computing (HPC) Consortium, an interagency effort organized by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, NASA

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Exascale: The Future of Supercomputing

Supercomputer is a term that’s been around for a long time – probably for as long as we’ve had computers. It refers to machines that are currently used only for very high-end applications and are a generation ahead of what everyone else is using. Expensive, generally custom-built machines that crunch numbers for cutting-edge scientific projects or generate mind-blowing images for the most sophisticated Hollywood blockbusters. 

Today, supercomputing – the development of which is known as high-performance computing (HPC) – is approaching “exascale.”

This refers to the speed at which it is capable of carrying out calculations – specifically the number of floating point operations per second (FLOPS) a machine can carry out. Today’s most powerful systems are approaching the point where this will start to be measured in exaFLOPS – a billion billion operations per second. Or 10 to the power of 18 (which is why we are celebrating Excacale

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