Global Hospital Information System Markets to 2025: Widespread Adoption of Cloud-Based Systems is Providing a Market Boost

Dublin, Dec. 04, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The “Hospital Information System Market: Global Industry Trends, Share, Size, Growth, Opportunity and Forecast 2020-2025” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering.

The global hospital information system market grew at a CAGR of around 12% during 2014-2019. Looking forward, the global hospital information system market to continue its strong growth during the next five years.

The hospital information system (HIS) refers to a digitally integrated information management system that is designed to manage healthcare data. It aids in minimizing the chances of errors by using tools, such as electronic medical records (EMR), computerized physicians order entry, laboratory information systems, pharmacy information systems and radiology information systems.

This replaces the paperwork, such as patient’s health history, prescriptions, doctor’s notes and dictations, with electronically preserved data. HIS also offers enhanced operational efficiencies and data management capabilities through data analytics, collaborative care, cost management and patient

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Global Hospital Information System Markets to 2025: Widespread Adoption of Cloud-Based Systems is Providing a Market Boost – Press Release

Dublin, Dec. 04, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The “Hospital Information System Market: Global Industry Trends, Share, Size, Growth, Opportunity and Forecast 2020-2025” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering.

The global hospital information system market grew at a CAGR of around 12% during 2014-2019. Looking forward, the global hospital information system market to continue its strong growth during the next five years.

The hospital information system (HIS) refers to a digitally integrated information management system that is designed to manage healthcare data. It aids in minimizing the chances of errors by using tools, such as electronic medical records (EMR), computerized physicians order entry, laboratory information systems, pharmacy information systems and radiology information systems.

This replaces the paperwork, such as patient’s health history, prescriptions, doctor’s notes and dictations, with electronically preserved data. HIS also offers enhanced operational efficiencies and data management capabilities through data analytics, collaborative care, cost management and patient

Read More

Researchers successfully track ‘bottle tags’ through Ganges River system into Bay of Bengal — ScienceDaily

A new study demonstrates the potential for plastic bottles tagged with tracking devices to deepen our understanding of how plastic pollution moves through rivers. Emily Duncan of the University of Exeter, U.K., and colleagues present this research in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on Dec 2, 2020.

Plastic pollution threatens natural ecosystems and human health worldwide. Previous research suggests that rivers transport up to 80 percent of the plastic pollution found in oceans. However, while ocean modeling and tracking technology have revealed detailed insights into how plastic litter moves and accumulates within oceans, river transport of plastic pollution remains poorly understood.

To help address this knowledge gap, Duncan and colleagues developed a new, low-cost, open-source tracking method that uses reclaimed 500 mL plastic bottles to house custom-designed electronics, allowing the bottles to be tracked via GPS cellular networks and satellite technology. These “bottle tags” mimic plastic beverage bottles, in the

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RESPEC Wins ACEC National Award for Innovative Eastern South Dakota Flood Information System

Big Sioux River Flood Information System project Receives Praise

RAPID CITY, S.D. (PRWEB) December 03, 2020

When RESPEC provided the state of South Dakota with the Big Sioux River Flood Information System (BSRFIS), we did not expect to win an award. We did what we always do: focused on the client’s needs, community improvement, and the residents’ safety. The BSRFIS advanced through local and state award stages to receive a national Engineering Excellence Award from the American Council of Engineering Companies (ACEC).

In 2014, a flood revealed shortcomings in available data and modeling that prevented state and local authorities from responding appropriately. The South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources (SD DENR) realized the need for a predictive model and comprehensive flood-mapping system.

RESPEC led the team that created the BSRFIS. We designed the BSRFIS so that observed and forecasted meteorological data fed into a basin-wide hydrologic model. When

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New energy conversion system will bridge gap between renewable energy and power grid

IMAGE

IMAGE: Wenyuan Li and Xingbo Liu are creating a new energy conversion system that has the potential to bridge renewable energy sources into the existing United States energy infrastructure.
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Credit: WVU

Engineers at West Virginia University are creating a new energy conversion system that has the potential to bridge renewable energy sources into the existing United States energy infrastructure.

As solar and wind energy become increasingly necessary to combat climate change, new energy conversion and storage technologies will be needed to maintain stability across the power grid.

“People talk a lot about a cleaner future and vow to replace carbon-based energy systems with renewables,” said Wenyuan Li, research assistant professor in the Statler College. “Attention has been focused on solar panels and wind turbines, but technology like this is the very throttle that decides how much renewables can eventually penetrate to the power grid and can be put

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For people with certain BRCA mutations, activating the immune system could be promising treatment — ScienceDaily

Treatments that harness the immune system to fight cancer have greatly improved outcomes for some people with cancer. Scientists are learning more about why some people respond much better than others to these drugs.

One major factor is something called tumor mutation burden (TMB) — the number of DNA changes a tumor has. Studies from researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering and elsewhere have shown that tumors with high TMB tend to respond better to immune checkpoint inhibitors. In 2017, the US Food and Drug Administration approved the checkpoint inhibitor pembrolizumab (Keytruda®) for the treatment of tumors with a type of genetic defect called mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency.

MMR is one of several DNA repair pathways that cells use to fix mistakes in DNA. Mutations in this pathway lead to faulty DNA repair and therefore to higher TMB. Next to MMR, the most commonly mutated DNA repair pathway is called homologous

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Chaotic early solar system collisions resembled ‘Asteroids’ arcade game — ScienceDaily

One Friday evening in 1992, a meteorite ended a more than 150 million-mile journey by smashing into the trunk of a red Chevrolet Malibu in Peekskill, New York. The car’s owner reported that the 30-pound remnant of the earliest days of our solar system was still warm and smelled of sulfur.

Nearly 30 years later, a new analysis of that same Peekskill meteorite and 17 others by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, has led to a new hypothesis about how asteroids formed during the early years of the solar system.

The meteorites studied in the research originated from asteroids and serve as natural samples of the space rocks. They indicate that the asteroids formed though violent bombardment and subsequent reassembly, a finding that runs counter to the prevailing idea that the young solar system was a peaceful place.

The study was

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Researchers hope sensor-based system can help farms detect ammonia

linephoto | E+ | Getty Images

A team in Denmark has developed a sensor-based system which could help to tackle air pollution by detecting ammonia and other gases emanating from the agriculture sector.

Alongside chemical engineers and chemists, researchers from Aarhus University and the Technical University of Denmark worked on the technology as part of the Ecometa project, which is focused on cutting emissions connected to agriculture. 

The researchers at the universities are focused on photonics, a term the European Commission has described as “the science and technology of light.” Details of their system have been published in the journal “MDPI Photonics.”

According to an announcement earlier this week, those involved in the project have produced an integrated optical sensor which “measures ammonia in the air using a laser, a gas sensor and hollow-core optical fibres.”

Andreas Hansel is a postdoctoral researcher at Aarhus University’s Department of Engineering. In a

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Research suggests our galaxy’s brightest gamma-ray binary system may be powered by a magnetar star — ScienceDaily

A team of researchers led by members of the Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli IPMU) has analyzed previously collected data to infer the true nature of a compact object — found to be a rotating magnetar, a type of neutron star with an extremely strong magnetic field — orbiting within LS 5039, the brightest gamma-ray binary system in the Galaxy.

Including former graduate student Hiroki Yoneda, Senior Scientist Kazuo Makishima and Principal Investigator Tadayuki Takahashi at the Kavli IMPU, the team also suggest that the particle acceleration process known to occur within LS 5039 is caused by interactions between the dense stellar winds of its primary massive star, and ultra-strong magnetic fields of the rotating magnetar.

Gamma-ray binaries are a system of massive stars and compact stars. They were discovered only recently, in 2004, when observations of very-high-energy gamma-rays in the teraelectronvolt (TeV) band

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Chaotic early solar system collisions resembled ‘asteroids’ arcade game

Chaotic early solar system collisions resembled 'asteroids' arcade game
A cross-polarized image of the Artracoona meteorite under 50 times magnification. Credit: Michael Lucas.

One Friday evening in 1992, a meteorite ended a more than 150 million-mile journey by smashing into the trunk of a red Chevrolet Malibu in Peekskill, New York. The car’s owner reported that the 30-pound remnant of the earliest days of our solar system was still warm and smelled of sulfur.


Nearly 30 years later, a new analysis of that same Peekskill meteorite and 17 others by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, has led to a new hypothesis about how asteroids formed during the early years of the solar system.

The meteorites studied in the research originated from asteroids and serve as natural samples of the space rocks. They indicate that the asteroids formed though violent bombardment and subsequent reassembly, a finding that runs counter to the

Read More