Intravascular Temperature Management Market Research Report 2020, Key Players with Technology Overview, Future Trends, Regulations, Forecast

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Dec 03, 2020 (Heraldkeepers) —
The report covers detailed competitive outlook including the market share and company profiles of the key participants operating in the Global market. Key players profiled in the report Zoll Medical Corporation (A Subsidiary of Asahi Kasei Corporation), Stryker Corporation, Medtronic PLC, Smiths Medical, 3M Company, Becton, Dickinson and Company, Gentherm Corporation, The Surgical Company Group, Belmont Instrument Corporation and Biegler GmbH. Company profile includes assign such as company summary, financial summary, business strategy and planning, SWOT analysis and current developments.

The Global Intravascular Temperature Management Market is expected to exceed more than US$ 211.0 Billion by 2024 at a CAGR of 3.5% in the given forecast period.

Browse Full Report @: https://www.marketresearchengine.com/intravascular-temperature-management-market

The Global Intravascular Temperature Management Market is segmented on the lines of type, application, and regional. Based on type segmentation

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Light-activated sensor delivers precision results at room temperature — ScienceDaily

Inspired by the surface of butterfly wings, researchers have developed a light-activated hydrogen sensor that produces ultra-precise results at room temperature.

The technology can detect hydrogen leaks well before they pose safety risks and can measure tiny amounts of the gas on people’s breath, for diagnosing gut disorders.

Commercial hydrogen sensors only work at temperatures of 150C or higher, but the prototype developed by researchers at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, is powered by light instead of heat.

The sensor, based on bumpy microstructures that imitate the surface of butterfly wings, is detailed in a new study published in the journal ACS Sensors.

Co-lead researcher Dr Ylias Sabri said the prototype was scalable, cost-effective and offered a total package of features that could not be matched by any hydrogen sensor currently on the market.

“Some sensors can measure tiny amounts, others can detect larger concentrations; they all need a

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Scientists develop an energy-efficient strategy to reversibly change ‘spin orientation’ or magnetization direction in magnetite at room temperature — ScienceDaily

Over the last few decades, conventional electronics has been rapidly reaching its technical limits in computing and information technology, calling for innovative devices that go beyond the mere manipulation of electron current. In this regard, spintronics, the study of devices that exploit the “spin” of electrons to perform functions, is one of the hottest areas in applied physics. But, measuring, altering, and, in general, working with this fundamental quantum property is no mean feat.

Current spintronic devices — for example, magnetic tunnel junctions — suffer from limitations such as high-power consumption, low operating temperatures, and severe constraints in material selection. To this end, a team of scientists at Tokyo University of Science and the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Japan, has recently published a study in ACS Nano, in which they present a surprisingly simple yet efficient strategy to manipulate the magnetization angle in magnetite (Fe3O

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Even in the Bolivian Amazon, Average Human Body Temperature Is Getting Cooler | Smart News

If you’ve ever taken your temperature and wondered why your body wasn’t hovering at the supposedly normal 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit, a new study offers the latest in a growing body of evidence suggesting that oft-repeated figure might no longer be the norm.

Published last month in the journal Science Advances, the study finds the average body temperature among the Tsimane people, who live in the Bolivian Amazon rainforest, has dropped by almost a full degree over the last 16 years.

The dogma of 98.6 degrees Fahrenheitstarted in 1867 when a German doctor named Carl Wunderlich took the temperature of some 25,000 people in Leipzig and arrived at the figure. But several recent studies have suggested that people have cooled off over the last 150 years.

A study published earlier this year compiled hundreds of thousands of temperature readings in Palo Alto, California, and found the average body temperature among

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Temperature rises with global warming could have major implications for child health, say researchers — ScienceDaily

Exposure to high temperatures in pregnancy is associated with an increase in adverse pregnancy outcomes, especially preterm birth and stillbirth, and among women in lower socioeconomic groups, finds a study published by The BMJ today.

Although the effects may appear small in size, the researchers say the findings “could have a major impact on public health as exposure to high temperatures is common and escalating.” Moreover, conditions such as preterm birth often have lifelong implications for affected newborns.

Increases in global temperatures raise concerns about heat impacts on health, especially in vulnerable groups such as the elderly, those living in poverty, and the chronically ill.

Previous evidence reviews have found associations between exposure to high temperatures and pregnancy outcomes, but have included few studies and have not assessed differences across population groups and by type of heat exposure.

So an international team of researchers set out to assess whether exposure

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Researchers examine the decline in average body temperature among healthy adults over the past two decades

Researchers examine the decline in average body temperature among healthy adults over the past two decades
A Tsimane family in a traditional house with no walls. Credit: Michael Gurven

In the nearly two centuries since German physician Carl Wunderlich established 98.6°F (37 C) as the standard “normal” body temperature, it has been used by parents and doctors alike as the measure by which fevers—and often the severity of illness—have been assessed.


Over time, however, and in more recent years, lower body temperatures have been widely reported in healthy adults. A 2017 study among 35,000 adults in the United Kingdom found average body temperature to be lower (97.9°F / 36.6 C), and a 2019 study showed that the normal body temperature in Americans (those in Palo Alto, California, anyway) is about 97.5°F (36.4 C).

A multinational team of physicians, anthropologists and local researchers led by Michael Gurven, UC Santa Barbara professor of anthropology and chair of the campus’s Integrative Anthropological Sciences Unit, and Thomas Kraft, a postdoctoral

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Average body temperature among healthy adults declined over the past two decades — ScienceDaily

In the nearly two centuries since German physician Carl Wunderlich established 98.6°F as the standard “normal” body temperature, it has been used by parents and doctors alike as the measure by which fevers — and often the severity of illness — have been assessed.

Over time, however, and in more recent years, lower body temperatures have been widely reported in healthy adults. A 2017 study among 35,000 adults in the United Kingdom found average body temperature to be lower (97.9°F), and a 2019 study showed that the normal body temperature in Americans (those in Palo Alto, California, anyway) is about 97.5°F.

A multinational team of physicians, anthropologists and local researchers led by Michael Gurven, UC Santa Barbara professor of anthropology and chair of the campus’s Integrative Anthropological Sciences Unit, and Thomas Kraft, a postdoctoral researcher in the same department, have found a similar decrease among the Tsimane, an indigenous population

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Global Ultra-Low Temperature Freezer Market- Featuring A/S Vestfrost, Bionics Scientific Technologies (P) Ltd., and Eppendorf AG, Among Others | Technavio

LONDON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–The ultra-low temperature freezer market is poised to grow by USD 184.57 million during 2020-2024, progressing at a CAGR of almost 5% during the forecast period.

The report on the ultra-low temperature freezer market provides a holistic update, market size and forecast, trends, growth drivers, and challenges, as well as vendor analysis.

The report offers an up-to-date analysis regarding the current global market scenario, latest trends and drivers, and the overall market environment. The market is driven by the rising investments in life science research.

Technavio suggests three forecast scenarios (optimistic, probable, and pessimistic) considering the impact of COVID-19. Download Free Sample Report on COVID-19 Recovery Analysis

The ultra-low temperature freezer market analysis includes the end-user segments and geographic landscapes. This study identifies technological advances as one of the prime reasons driving the ultra-low temperature freezer market growth during the next few years.

This report presents a

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Physicists made a superconductor that works at room temperature. It could one day give rise to high-speed floating trains.



When squeezed between two diamonds, a material made of carbon, sulfur, and hydrogen can become a superconductor. J. Adam Fenster/University of Rochester


© J. Adam Fenster/University of Rochester
When squeezed between two diamonds, a material made of carbon, sulfur, and hydrogen can become a superconductor. J. Adam Fenster/University of Rochester

  • Superconductors are materials that effortlessly conduct electricity.
  • Until now, they’ve only worked at temperatures of minus 100 degrees Fahrenheit. 
  • But researchers recently found a superconductor that works at ambient temperatures when under immense pressure. They’re now trying to make it work without that pressure.
  • Widespread superconductors could give rise to high-speed floating trains, super-powered computers, and very cheap electricity.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Superconductors – materials that transport electricity with no energy lost – have until now only worked at extremely cold temperatures, from about -100 degrees Fahrenheit to the near-absolute zero of space. But this month, that changed.

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In a study published October 14, a team of researchers described a superconductor they engineered, which works at

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