Twitter Ends Threaded Conversations Tests After Negative User Feedback

This year, Twitter has been testing threaded replies for some iOS and web users, with the aim of making it easier to see how conversations evolve. However, it turns out the new-look, Reddit-style replies were actually more confusing for users of the typical conversation interface, and the company has decided to roll back the changes.

twitter threaded conversations


Those who trialed the new layout for replies saw lines and indentations that were supposed to make it clearer who is talking to whom and to fit more of the conversation in one view. Twitter also put engagement actions such as Like, Retweet, and Reply icons behind an extra tap in an effort to make replies to conversations easier to follow. The features were first trialed in the experimental twttr beta app and then added to the regular app a few months later.

But negative user feedback made the company revert the branching Twitter conversations

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No nanoparticle risks to humans found in field tests of spray sunscreens — ScienceDaily

People can continue using mineral-based aerosol sunscreens without fear of exposure to dangerous levels of nanoparticles or other respirable particulates, according to Penn State research published in the journal Aerosol Science and Engineering.

The findings, reported by a research team led by Jeremy Gernand, associate professor of industrial health and safety, are a result of experiments conducted using three aerosol sunscreens commonly found on store shelves.

Gernand’s team simulated the application process for someone using the recommended amount of sunscreen and analyzed the released aerosols. They chose mineral-based sunscreens with silicon dioxide, zinc oxide or titanium dioxide as the active ingredient over chemical-based sunscreens because those are more commonly recommended for children and the ingredients are deemed safe by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

“We simulated what we considered to be a worst-case scenario for someone being exposed to aerosolized nanoparticles while applying sunscreen, and that scenario is

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Texas Tech head coach Matt Wells tests positive for COVID-19 ahead of game vs. Kansas

Texas Tech announced Thursday that head football coach Matt Wells has tested positive for COVID-19.

The Red Raiders (3-6, 2-6 Big 12) are scheduled to host Kansas for an 11 a.m. kickoff on Saturday in Lubbock.

”Texas Tech received notification earlier this morning that Coach Wells tested positive for COVID-19. At this time, Coach Wells has returned home to self-isolate and will continue his duties remotely leading into Saturday’s game against Kansas,” the school said in a statement.

“He will remain in the Big 12′s testing guidelines in order to confirm the positive test. In the case Wells is unable to lead the Red Raiders on Saturday, defensive coordinator Keith Patterson will serve in the head coach capacity.”

Wells is 7-14 since taking over the Red Raiders, who after a big comeback of their own to beat Baylor on a game-ending field goal in their last home game three weeks

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New tests identify early changes in Alzheimer’s disease before symptoms appear — ScienceDaily

Researchers at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden, together with their colleagues at the Barcelona Beta Research Centre in Spain, the University Medical Centre in Ljubljana, Slovenia, and the University of Paris, have found new forms of tau protein that become abnormal in the very early stages of Alzheimer’s disease before cognitive problems develop. The scientists developed new tools to detect these subtle changes and confirmed their results in human samples.

At a time when the incidence and social costs of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease in particular continue to rise, this breakthrough is very timely as it could enable the detection of the disease much earlier than current approaches. The findings are also important for the testing of therapies against this devastating disease.

Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by two pathological changes in brain tissue. One is a protein called tau while the other involves the amyloid beta peptide. Both can

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The Latest: Croatia’s Prime Minister Tests Positive | Washington News

ZAGREB, Croatia — Croatia’s Prime Minister Andrej Plenkovic has tested positive for the new coronavirus.

Government spokesman Marko Milic says Plenkovic is feeling fine and will continue to perform his duties from his home.

The announcement came after Plenkovic’s wife tested positive for the virus on weekend. Plenkovic’s initial test came out negative but was repeated on Monday.

Croatia has faced weeks of soaring infections with the new coronavirus. On Monday, Croatia reported a record death toll of 74 fatalities in the past 24 hours and 1,830 new infections.

The government on Monday also tightened travel restrictions requesting a negative test for most people seeking to enter the country.

— Moderna asking US, European regulators to OK its virus shots

— Fauci: US may see ‘surge upon surge’ of virus in coming weeks after Thanksgiving travel

— U.K. stocks up on vaccines, hopes to start virus shots within days

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Dain Leaders tests the digital tracking technology for international students using the ‘Proof of Concept (PoC).’

SEOUL, South Korea, Nov. 24, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Dain Leaders(https://www.dainleaders.com/), a Blockchain edutech specialist, has announced that they have supported the proof of concept (PoC) of Blockchain for international student matching platform.

Dain Leaders joined a recent project of the Ministry of Science and ICT and the National IT Industry Promotion Agency (NIPA) for the proof of concept to prevent forgery and alteration of documents required for the admissions of international students and reduce the amount of work required to verify authenticity for the credibility of admissions process.

There currently are about 160,000 international students from 180 countries taking degree programs and language training courses at colleges in Korea. As more international students are coming to Korea every year, cases of applicants submitting fraudulent documents for illegal employment are also growing. Therefore, it is difficult for the colleges and other educational institutions to verify the authenticity of documents that

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The Latest: LA Rams player tests positive for coronavirus | Sports

The Latest on the effects of the coronavirus outbreak on sports around the world:

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The Los Angeles Rams will hold their team meetings from home Wednesday after an unidentified player tested positive for coronavirus Tuesday night.

The player is self-quarantining, and the Rams say they are “entering intensive protocol.” The Rams were scheduled only for a light walkthrough practice Wednesday with an extra-long week of preparation for their game at Tampa Bay on Monday night.

Rams players and coaches will hold their normal meeting schedule from home. They haven’t determined their schedule for the rest of the week.

Los Angeles center Brian Allen was the first NFL player to confirm he had tested positive for coronavirus back in April. Other Rams players who have already recovered from COVID-19 infections include left tackle Andrew Whitworth and linebacker Terrell Lewis.

The Rams (6-3) beat the Seattle Seahawks 23-16 last Sunday to

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LA Rams player tests positive for coronavirus

The Latest on the effects of the coronavirus outbreak on sports around the world:

The Los Angeles Rams will hold their team meetings from home Wednesday after an unidentified player tested positive for coronavirus Tuesday night.

The player is self-quarantining, and the Rams say they are “entering intensive protocol.” The Rams were scheduled only for a light walkthrough practice Wednesday with an extra-long week of preparation for their game at Tampa Bay on Monday night.

Rams players and coaches will hold their normal meeting schedule from home. They haven’t determined their schedule for the rest of the week.

Los Angeles center Brian Allen was the first NFL player to confirm he had tested positive for coronavirus back in April. Other Rams players who have already recovered from COVID-19 infections include left tackle Andrew Whitworth and linebacker Terrell Lewis.

The Rams (6-3) beat the Seattle Seahawks 23-16 last Sunday to move

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Opinion | At-Home Covid Tests and Other Powers of a Tech Billionaire



Chamath Palihapitiya is one of Silicon Valley’s most successful tech investors. He’s also among the most candid. “I aspire to be a Koch brother before I aspire to be an under secretary,” he tells Kara Swisher on this episode of “Sway.” His definition of power has little to do with politics — it’s profits, he says, that empower you to “control the resources.”

Mr. Palihapitiya made his first fortune as an early executive at Facebook. He has since multiplied his wealth as an investor, with big bets and bold forecasts about the future. These days, he’s behind one of the most lucrative and controversial trends — SPACs, the acronym for blank check or special purpose acquisition companies, which some call the next bubble.

On this episode of “Sway,” Mr. Palihapitiya shares his predictions for American economic recovery

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Inside look at how NASA tests its new xEMU spacesuits

  • NASA is developing a new spacesuit for the first time in 40 years.
  • It will be used in the upcoming Artemis program — NASA’s plan to send astronauts to the moon by 2024.
  • But before it’s flight ready, the Exploration Extravehicular Mobility Unit, or xEMU, must go through three stages of rigorous testing.
  • These include underwater tests, temperature tests, and durability tests.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Following is a transcript of the video.

Narrator: This isn’t your traditional bathing suit. It’s actually NASA’s Exploration Extravehicular Mobility Unit, or xEMU, the first new flight spacesuit developed by the agency in over 40 years. And it’s what the next astronauts will wear when we finally go back to the moon in 2024. But before its boots touch the lunar surface, the suit must be tested, rigorously.

Amy Ross: We know that if we don’t do our job well, we

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