Microsoft aims to help businesses get handle on data with new tool

By Stephen Nellis



a store inside of a building: FILE PHOTO: A Microsoft logo is seen in Los Angeles


© Reuters/LUCY NICHOLSON
FILE PHOTO: A Microsoft logo is seen in Los Angeles

(Reuters) – Microsoft Corp on Thursday announced a new cloud-based tool designed to help corporate customers understand where data is scattered throughout their operations and whether they are in compliance with data privacy regulations.

Once known for its Windows operating system and applications such as Office, Microsoft has built a large business in cloud computing, helping store and process huge amounts of data for corporate customers.

Last year, it introduced a tool called Azure Synapse that is being used by companies such as FedEx Corp to analyze the flow of its 16 million daily packages.

Gallery: 14 of the best email apps to help you achieve inbox zero (Pocket-lint)

But for large companies, stores of data have become so large, and distributed across so many countries, that Microsoft is rolling out a tool called

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Corrections Departments Manage Pandemic in Prisons With Free COVID Tool From Vant4ge, a Leader in Criminal Justice Technology

SALT LAKE CITY – December 3, 2020 – ( Newswire.com )

​​​​​The coronavirus pandemic continues to have a disproportionately adverse effect on the United States’ prison population. According to The Marshall Project, there have been nearly 200,000 cases among inmates and more than 1,400 deaths, resulting in corrections agencies being overwhelmed. A 20-year leader in criminal justice technology, Vant4ge is contributing to the mitigation effort by offering a free COVID-19 tool to help corrections departments manage the crisis and determine which inmates are the safest to release early. The comprehensive Vant4gePoint software platform that allows agencies to efficiently coordinate care and rehabilitation for inmates and parolees also consists of the most predictive assessments ever developed. In response to the pandemic, Vant4ge is making the risk assessment tool that features evidence-based, data-driven assessment instruments with automated scoring and reporting available to corrections administrators and case managers.  

“As a tech company

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New tool to predict breast cancer recurrences

A new tool combining traditional pathology with machine learning could predict which breast cancer patients actually need surgery. The technology, reported in the November issue of American Journal of Physiology — Cell Physiology (vol. 319: C910-C921; https://doi.org/10.1152/ajpcell.00280.2020), could spare women from unnecessary treatments, reduce medical expenses, and lead to a new generation of drugs to stop breast cancer recurrences.

Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast, an early form of disease also known as stage 0 breast cancer, is a diagnosis that only sometimes leads to invasive breast cancer. But only some patients need surgery, chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, and the rest could be sent home. Predicting the outcomes of patients with early forms of cancer has been a major scientific problem for decades.

Professor Howard Petty and Ms. Alexandra Kraft, his research assistant, both of the University of Michigan, have just

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Global $6.7 Billion CRISPR Technology Market Opportunities to 2030: Cas9 And gRNA, Design Tool, Plasmid and Vector, Other Delivery System Products

DUBLIN, Nov. 30, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The “CRISPR Technology Global Market Opportunities and Strategies to 2030: COVID-19 Growth and Change” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering.

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This report describes and evaluates the global CRISPR technology market. It covers 2015 to 2019, termed the historic period, and 2019 to 2023 termed the forecast period, along with further forecasts for the periods 2023-2025 and 2025-2030.

The global CRISPR technology market reached a value of nearly $685.5 million in 2019, having increased at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 35.0% since 2015. The market is expected to grow from $685.5 million in 2019 to $1,654.2 million in 2020 at a rate of 24.6%. It is expected to reach $2,569.8 million in 2023, and $6,703.7 million in 2030.

Growth in the historic period resulted from rise in funding, and increase in pharmaceutical R&D expenditure. Factors that negatively affected growth in the

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Cas9 And gRNA, Design Tool, Plasmid and Vector, Other Delivery System Products

DUBLIN, Nov. 30, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The “CRISPR Technology Global Market Opportunities and Strategies to 2030: COVID-19 Growth and Change” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering.

This report describes and evaluates the global CRISPR technology market. It covers 2015 to 2019, termed the historic period, and 2019 to 2023 termed the forecast period, along with further forecasts for the periods 2023-2025 and 2025-2030.

The global CRISPR technology market reached a value of nearly $685.5 million in 2019, having increased at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 35.0% since 2015. The market is expected to grow from $685.5 million in 2019 to $1,654.2 million in 2020 at a rate of 24.6%. It is expected to reach $2,569.8 million in 2023, and $6,703.7 million in 2030.

Growth in the historic period resulted from rise in funding, and increase in pharmaceutical R&D expenditure. Factors that negatively affected growth in the

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Fujifilm’s Flagship Camera Is Now Also a Forensics Tool

Illustration for article titled Fujifilms Flagship Camera Can Now Be Used In Crime Scenes and Art Preservation

Photo: Fujifilm

Fujifilm announced the launch of its updated GFX100 large format mirrorless digital camera on Wednesday, which now comes equipped with infrared image-making capabilities that could be used in forensic, scientific, and cultural preservation capacities.

Through its new Pixel Shift Multi-Shot function, the GFX100 IR can now be used to “reveal intricate details within a subject or scene that can only normally be seen through the infrared spectrum.”

The IR comes equipped with filters in front of the camera lens that allow its users to make pictures at a variety of different light wavelengths (with the option of still using the camera normally to take pictures of colors along the visible spectrum).

The added features will be “invaluable for cultural research,” Fujifilm said in a statement, because “reviewing images of a subject in infrared could ultimately lead to potentially unlocking untold secrets from

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AI tool could help clinicians provide more effective COVID-19 intervention — ScienceDaily

With communities across the nation experiencing a wave of COVID-19 infections, clinicians need effective tools that will enable them to aggressively and accurately treat each patient based on their specific disease presentation, health history, and medical risks.

In research recently published online in Medical Image Analysis, a team of engineers demonstrated how a new algorithm they developed was able to successfully predict whether or not a COVID-19 patient would need ICU intervention. This artificial intelligence-based approach could be a valuable tool in determining a proper course of treatment for individual patients.

The research team, led by Pingkun Yan, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, developed this method by combining chest computed tomography (CT) images that assess the severity of a patient’s lung infection with non-imaging data, such as demographic information, vital signs, and laboratory blood test results. By combining these data points, the algorithm is

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A repetitive DNA sequence that causes health risks when it malfunctions can now be watched inside living cells using a synthetic tool — ScienceDaily

A new synthetic probe offers a safe and straightforward approach for visualizing chromosome tips in living cells. The probe was designed by scientists at the Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Science (iCeMS) and colleagues at Kyoto University, and could advance research into aging and a wide range of diseases, including cancers. The details were published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

“Chromosome ends are constantly at risk of degradation and fusion, so they are protected by structures called telomeres, which are made of long repeating DNA sequences and bound proteins,” says iCeMS chemical biologist Hiroshi Sugiyama, who led the study. “If telomeres malfunction, they are unable to maintain chromosome stability, which can lead to diseases such as cancer. Also, telomeres normally shorten with each cell division until they reach their limit, causing cell death.”

Visualizing telomeres, especially their physical arrangements in real-time, is important for understanding their relevance

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Google’s new tool helps cities plant trees to combat the climate crisis

googletrees

Google is scoping out tree coverage in Los Angeles.


Google

Google is working on bringing more shade to help cool our cities as the climate crisis worsens. The new Tree Canopy Lab combines artificial intelligence and aerial imaging to help cities see where there are gaps in their tree coverage and tree planting projects. Cities will then know where to plant more trees, Google said.

Google is working with the City of Los Angeles on the project, and said it plans to make insights from Tree Canopy Lab available to hundreds of cities in the next year. 

“Extreme temperatures are becoming more common in cities where concrete and infrastructure are now creating heat islands — areas that experience higher temperatures, leading to poor air quality, dehydration and other public health concerns,” Google

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3D bioprinted heart provides new tool for surgeons — ScienceDaily

Professor of Biomedical Engineering Adam Feinberg and his team have created the first full-size 3D bioprinted human heart model using their Freeform Reversible Embedding of Suspended Hydrogels (FRESH) technique. Showcased in a recent video by American Chemical Society and created from MRI data using a specially built 3D printer, the model mimics the elasticity of cardiac tissue and sutures realistically. This milestone represents the culmination of two years of research, holding both immediate promise for surgeons and clinicians, as well as long term implications for the future of bioengineered organ research.

The FRESH technique of 3D bioprinting was invented in Feinberg’s lab to fill an unfilled demand for 3D printed soft polymers, which lack the rigidity to stand unsupported as in a normal print. FRESH 3D printing uses a needle to inject bioink into a bath of soft hydrogel, which supports the object as it prints. Once finished, a simple

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