China turns on nuclear-powered ‘artificial sun’

The HL-2M Tokamak reactor is China's largest and most advanced nuclear fusion experimental research device and can reach tempera
The HL-2M Tokamak reactor is China’s largest and most advanced nuclear fusion experimental research device and can reach temperatures of over 150 million degrees Celsius

China successfully powered up its “artificial sun” nuclear fusion reactor for the first time, state media reported Friday, marking a great advance in the country’s nuclear power research capabilities.


The HL-2M Tokamak reactor is China’s largest and most advanced nuclear fusion experimental research device, and scientists hope that the device can potentially unlock a powerful clean energy source.

It uses a powerful magnetic field to fuse hot plasma and can reach temperatures of over 150 million degrees Celsius, according to the People’s Daily—approximately ten times hotter than the core of the sun.

Located in southwestern Sichuan province and completed late last year, the reactor is often called an “artificial sun” on account of the enormous heat and power it produces.

“The development of nuclear fusion

Read More

Twitter turns off threaded replies because they made conversations hard to read

Twitter has been experimenting with threaded replies for some time as a way to potentially make replies easier to read and follow. But the company has decided to end those experiments because of user feedback, it announced on Thursday.

“We asked and you let us know this reply layout wasn’t it, as it was harder to read and join conversations,” the company wrote in a tweet published today. “So we’ve turned off this format to work on other ways to improve conversations on Twitter.”

In a follow-up tweet, the company said threaded replies made conversations harder to read and join

Read More

TensorFlow Turns 5 – Five Reasons Why It Is The Most Popular ML Framework

This month, Tensorflow, the open source machine learning and deep learning framework from Google, has turned five. 

TensorFlow has become the most popular tool and framework for machine learning in a short span of time. It enjoys tremendous popularity among ML engineers and developers. 

According to the Hacker News Hiring Trends, May 2020, TensorFlow jobs are in great demand. 

Stack Overflow points us to a similar trend where TensorFlow is growing at an extraordinary pace.

Here are five reasons behind TensorFlow’s popularity:

1. The most ubiquitous AI platform available for developers

TensorFlow is the only framework available for running machine learning models from the cloud to the tiniest microcontroller device. Models trained with TensorFlow can be optimized for CPU and GPU. From x86 to ARM64, NVIDIA GPU to Google TPU, the models support diverse architectures.

With TensorFlow Lite, the

Read More

Teacher’s decades-old find turns out to be the island’s first-ever dinosaur discovery

You never know what you might find while walking along the beach.



a person holding an animal: Mike Simms, who led the research team, holds the theropod tibia on the left and the Scelidosaurus femur on the right.


© From University of Portsmouth
Mike Simms, who led the research team, holds the theropod tibia on the left and the Scelidosaurus femur on the right.

People often come across coins, shells and trash, but a teacher in Northern Ireland made a discovery that will go down in history.

In the 1980s, the late Roger Byrne, a schoolteacher and fossil collector, found several unidentified fossils on the east coast of County Antrim. He held onto them for several years before donating them to the Ulster Museum in Belfast.

Mystery swirled around what the fossils could be until a team of researchers with the University of Portsmouth and Queen’s University Belfast confirmed they are fossilized dinosaur bones.

The 200-million-year-old fossils are the “first dinosaur remains reported from anywhere in Ireland,” according to the article by the research

Read More

Teacher’s decades-old find on a Northern Ireland beach turns out to be the island’s first-ever dinosaur discovery

You never know what you might find while walking along the beach.



a person holding an animal: Mike Simms, who led the research team, holds the theropod tibia on the left and the Scelidosaurus femur on the right.


© From University of Portsmouth
Mike Simms, who led the research team, holds the theropod tibia on the left and the Scelidosaurus femur on the right.

People often come across coins, shells and trash, but a teacher in Northern Ireland made a discovery that will go down in history.

In the 1980s, the late Roger Byrne, a schoolteacher and fossil collector, found several unidentified fossils on the east coast of County Antrim. He held onto them for several years before donating them to the Ulster Museum in Belfast.

Mystery swirled around what the fossils could be until a team of researchers with the University of Portsmouth and Queen’s University Belfast confirmed they are fossilized dinosaur bones.

The 200-million-year-old fossils are the “first dinosaur remains reported from anywhere in Ireland,” according to the article by the research

Read More

Software update for Fujifilm’s GFX100 turns it into a 400 MP camera

With its 102-megapixel sensor, Fujifilm’s $10,000 GFX100 can already capture incredibly dense images that bring out tiny details in a subject. But with the help of new firmware and a technique called pixel shift multi-shot, the GFX100 can now capture 400-megapixel images.



a close up of a camera


As PetaPixel explains, to accomplish the feat the camera uses a combination of its 102-megapixel sensor and in-body stabilization. The latter component will move the sensor in tiny, 0.5-pixel increments while it captures 16 separate RAW images. Fuji’s new Pixel Shift Combiner software then stitches together those RAW files into a single 400-megapixel digital negative (DNG) images that apps like Capture One can edit.  



a glass display case


© Provided by Engadget


As you might have guessed, a 400-megapixel image is substantially bigger than one of its 100-megapixel counterparts, with the former taking up as much as 200 megabytes when compressed into a JPEG file. The denser image is also more cumbersome

Read More

The Ulanzi ST-09 Turns the Apple Watch Into a Camera Viewfinder

If you’re snapping a quick selfie for social media, the lower quality camera on the front of your smartphone is usually just fine. But what if you want to use the higher quality lenses and camera on the back to film yourself? It means you can’t see the screen and no longer have a live preview of yourself for framing. The solution? A simple clamp attachment for iPhones that turns the Apple Watch into a tiny viewfinder.

At first, the $20 Ulanzi ST-09 Phone Tripod Mount for Apple Watch seems like a foolish use for the $200+ smartwatch strapped to your wrist. But as you think about it more, you realize the mount solves a problem that many amateur vloggers who rely on their smartphones for all of their production needs run into: using the back camera to film yourself is all but impossible (unless you’re standing in front of

Read More

CVG turns to new technology, stringent cleaning protocols to keep travelers safe during busy holiday

HEBRON, Ky. — Even though the CDC has recommended that people stay home for the Thanksgiving holiday, the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport is still anticipating its busiest travel days since the start of the pandemic.

In order to cope with the increase in travelers at the airport, CVG is turning to technology to keep COVID-19 at bay.

Part of this new technology is utilizing a robot called “Gita” that helps make at least one of the jobs at CVG a contactless experience. The robot uses the push of a button and a censor to follow staff through the airport while they assist travelers to the gate or hand out supplies.

Gita robot at CVG

Whitney Miller

The “Gita” robot, which is being utilized at CVG for contactless services, includes self-balancing technology so it it can start and stop with the speed of a person and can turn by spinning with a zero turning radius.
Read More

Invention Turns Rotten Veggies to Renewable Energy

Apparently, rotting vegetables can be good for something other than fertilizer. Instead of literally going to waste, they can be upcycled to create a material that absorbs stray ultraviolet rays and turn it into renewable energy.

The material is called AuREUS and is the brainchild of Carvey Ehren Maigue, a 27-year-old engineering student from Mapúa University in the Philippines. For the invention, Maigue is also this year’s recipient of the James Dyson Award in the sustainability category. Basically, crop waste—including certain rotting fruits and veggies—contains luminescent particles. Maigue figured out a way to suspend those particles in a resin substrate. When ultraviolet rays come in contact with the material, those particles then absorb and re-emit visible light along the edges—the same principles that generate the aurora borealis. The main difference is that Maigue placed photovoltaic cells along the edges of the material, which then turns the captured energy

Read More

Fossil shark turns into mystery pterosaur — ScienceDaily

Palaeontologists have made a surprising discovery while searching through 100-year-old fossil collections from the UK — a new mystery species of pterosaur, unlike anything seen before.

Lead author of the project, University of Portsmouth PhD student Roy Smith, discovered the mystery creature amongst fossil collections housed in the Sedgwick Museum of Cambridge and the Booth Museum at Brighton that were assembled when phosphate mining was at its peak in the English Fens between 1851 and 1900. These fossils found while workmen were digging phosphate nodules were frequently sold to earn a little bit of extra money.

It was while Smith was examining the fossils of shark spines that he made the amazing discovery. The fossils were actually fragments of jaws of toothless pterosaurs, which do indeed resemble shark fin spines, but there are many subtle differences that allow them to be distinguished.

Smith says: “One such feature are tiny little

Read More