Amazon’s cloud unit taps own chips for new supercomputing offering

Dec 1 (Reuters) – Amazon.com Inc’s cloud unit on Tuesday offered a new supercomputing service based on its self-designed processors, a further sign of how chips based on Arm Ltd’s technology are encroaching on Intel Corp and Advanced Micro Devices Inc turf.

Amazon Web Services, or AWS, sells its computing services based on the customer’s choice of an underlying central processor chip. Software developers have traditionally chosen between Intel or AMD products, but since 2018 Amazon has also offered its own “Graviton” chips designed with technology from Arm, which is in the midst of a $40 billion takeover by Nvidia Corp.

Arm-based chips have long powered mobile phones because they can operate on very low power levels, but they are increasingly used in data centers where their power efficiency helps control costs. The world’s fastest computing system, the Fugaku supercomputer in Japan, is based on Arm chips.

Supercomputing helps with

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Paterson Charter School for Science and Technology (PCSST) Army JROTC Earns Honor Unit with Distinction

PATERSON, NJ  – The Paterson Charter School for Science and Technology (PCSST) JROTC Lion Battalion announced that it has once again earned the highest unit qualification possible for SY 2020-2021, first awarded during the last school year. The most sought-after unit award is the Honor Unit with Distinction (HUD – Gold Star) rating.  

“Our Lion Battalion Cadets work hard to maintain this unique Honor Unit with Distinction rating from year to year,” said Senior Army Instructor LTC (R) Mike Hodges. “It validates the value of the system to our school and community and further enhances our recommendations for our cadets’ future endeavors.”

The LION Battalion is currently commanded by Cadet LTC Jabria Smith, and her senior enlisted advisor is Cadet CSM Jeremy Chomba. Where effective leadership is critical, this achievement required the cadet battalion to score at least 95% on a rigorous 5-hour inspection conducted by the JROTC Chief from

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Google, Facebook will be subject to competition code from new UK unit

  • The UK on Friday introduced a new “pro-competition” watchdog to regulate Google, Facebook, and others.
  • The Digital Markets Unit will enforce a new code, adding data-transparency requirements and helping small businesses promote themselves online, according to the announcement.
  • Ronan Harris, vice president of Google UK & Ireland, said the search giant looks forward to “working constructively” with the new unit.
  • From April 2021, the unit “could be given powers to suspend, block and reverse decisions of tech giants,” the government said. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The UK on Friday announced a government unit to enforce a new competition code on Google, Facebook, and other tech giants, beginning in April 2021.

The business secretary, Alok Sharma, said in a statement that companies like Google and Facebook make a “significant contribution” to the UK economy, but “the dominance of just a few big tech companies is leading to less

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Creator Of Amazon’s Zoox Robotaxi Unit Has A New Self-Driving Startup

As Zoox, the secretive robotaxi developer recently acquired by Amazon, gets ready to unveil its futuristic fleet vehicle, its former CEO who dreamed up the company is re-emerging with a new startup that’s designing AI-enabled software he hopes will allow cars to “teach themselves” to drive.

Early-stage HYPR, created by Zoox cofounder Tim Kentley Klay, says it’s using reinforcement learning, a branch of machine learning that utilizes a reward-based approach, to train driving algorithms dynamically–ideally with no need for direct human instruction or supervision. The Alameda, California-based startup has raised a $10 million seed round and begun testing its approach with a modified Daimler Smart Car. Backers include R7 Ventures and Australian billionaire Andrew Forrest.

Kentley Klay “kicked in a modest  amount,” he says without elaborating. 

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Short Sellers Target Ping An’s Fintech Unit After Ant IPO Fiasco

(Bloomberg) — The headwinds that toppled Ant Group Co.’s initial public offering now threaten a $22 billion dream of China’s Ping An Insurance (Group) Co. — to pivot from a finance group to a tech giant and be valued like one.

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While Ping An’s Lufax Holding Ltd., which offers wealth management and retail lending services, was able to complete its U.S. IPO days before new Chinese rules torpedoed Ant’s $35 billion sale, the stock has given up early gains and is now a target for short sellers. Renewed threats by U.S. regulators to delist Chinese stocks also threaten Ping An’s plans to take more of its in-house startups public.

Ant’s IPO suspension “fundamentally changed near-term investment appetite” for Chinese fintech stocks, with Lufax as “the community’s No. 1 consensus short,” according to a Nov. 5 report from Procensus, which polled 84 global investors managing $15.3 trillion. Short interest

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The UK’s new offensive cyber unit takes on organised crime and hostile states

A new offensive force made up of spies, cyber experts and the members of the military is already conducting cyber operations to disrupt hostile state activities, terrorists and criminals, the UK government has revealed.

The new group – known as the National Cyber Force – aims to tackle threats to the UK’s national security such as countering terror plots, as well as supporting UK military operations.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson told parliament that the new force was already up and running: “I can announce that we have established a National Cyber Force, combining our intelligence agencies and service personnel, which is already operating in cyberspace against terrorism, organised crime and hostile state activity,” he said.

SEE: What is cyberwar? Everything you need to know about the frightening future of digital conflict

The National Cyber Force draws together experts from intelligence agency GCHQ, the Ministry of Defence, the Defence Science and

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GE health unit buys Swedish start-up Prismatic Sensors, bolstering key medical imaging business

Larry Culp, CEO, General Electric

Scott Mlyn | CNBC

GE Healthcare announced Friday it is acquiring Swedish start-up Prismatic Sensors AB, bolstering its key medical imaging business.

Prismatic Sensors AB was founded in 2012 as a spin-off from KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden. It makes detectors for medical x-ray imaging.

GE Healthcare, a subsidiary of General Electric, said the start-up’s technology offers sharper images with fewer doses of radiation to patients. It has the potential to be a “substantial step forward” in detecting cancer, heart disorders and other diseases, the company said, declining to disclose the terms of the deal.

The company said the acquisition fits within its mission to help medical workers deliver more precise diagnoses and detect diseases earlier.

The technology could eventually be used to detect cancers at an earlier stage, GE Healthcare CEO Kieran Murphy said in an interview with CNBC, adding the

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Huawei confirms plan to sell its Honor smartphone unit to ensure its survival

(Reuters) — Huawei is selling its budget brand smartphone unit Honor to a consortium of over 30 agents and dealers in a bid to keep it alive, the company and the consortium said on Tuesday.

The deal comes after U.S. government sanctions have restricted supplies to the Chinese company on grounds the firm is a national security threat – which it denies.

The consortium issued a statement on Tuesday announcing the purchase, which will be made via a new company, Shenzhen Zhixin New Information Technology.

Huawei will not hold any shares in the new Honor company after the sale, the statement said.

In Huawei’s statement, the company said its consumer business has been under “tremendous pressure” due to the “persistent unavailability of technical elements” for its phone business.

“This move has been made by Honor’s industry chain to ensure its own survival,” Huawei said.

The change of ownership

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Huawei Sells Honor Unit ‘To Ensure Its Own Survival,’ But Loses Smartphone Synergy

Huawei, the Chinese telecom giant once ranked as the world’s largest smartphone maker and increasingly squeezed by Washington, announced Tuesday that it would sell its budget handset brand Honor to a government-backed consortium in a bid for the unit’s survival.

Huawei has been struggling to overcome restrictions on crucial chip technologies by the U.S., which calls the company a national security threat. By breaking off, Honor can get smartphone supplies without Washington’s blockade, but will lose access to Huawei’s resources and may even face new U.S. restrictions in the longer term, analysts warn.

“This move has been made by Honor’s industry chain to ensure its own survival,” Huawei said in a statement. “Huawei’s consumer business has been under tremendous pressure as of late. This has been due to a

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Huawei sells Honor brand to consortium to keep budget smartphone unit

A woman shows a Huawei Honor smartphone on Nov. 10, 2020 in Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province of China.

Long Wei | VCG | Visual China Group | Getty Images

Huawei Technologies is selling its budget brand smartphone unit Honor to a consortium of over 30 agents and dealers in a bid to keep it alive, the company and the consortium said on Tuesday.

The deal comes after U.S. government sanctions have restricted supplies to the Chinese company on grounds the firm is a national security threat — which it denies.

The consortium issued a statement on Tuesday announcing the purchase, which will be made via a new company, Shenzhen Zhixin New Information Technology.

Huawei will not hold any shares in the new Honor company after the sale, the statement said.

In Huawei’s statement, the company said its consumer business has been under “tremendous pressure” due to the “persistent unavailability of technical

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