A hint of new physics in polarized radiation from the early universe — ScienceDaily

Using Planck data from the cosmic microwave background radiation, an international team of researchers has observed a hint of new physics. The team developed a new method to measure the polarization angle of the ancient light by calibrating it with dust emission from our own Milky Way.

While the signal is not detected with enough precision to draw definite conclusions, it may suggest that dark matter or dark energy causes a violation of the so-called “parity symmetry.”

The laws of physics governing the Universe are thought not to change when flipped around in a mirror. For example, electromagnetism works the same regardless of whether you are in the original system, or in a mirrored system in which all spatial coordinates have been flipped.

If this symmetry, called “parity,” is violated, it may hold the key to understanding the elusive nature of dark matter and dark energy, which occupy 25 and

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Following Apple Award Win, Shanghai Developers Of Genshin Impact Hopes To Build Its Own ‘Marvel Universe’

When Forrest Liu and his Shanghai-based video game developer company MiHoYo decided in 2017 to build a new mobile game to accompany its successful action RPG (role-playing game) Honkai Impact series, he envisioned an open-world style adventure, in which users can roam freely with their virtual characters.

The problem was, while open-world games have been all the rage in the console and PC space, it had never been done before in the mobile gaming space.

“It seemed like an impossible task,” Liu says. But after three years of development and “over 100 million yuan spent on the project,” the open-world mobile game Genshin Impact made its debut this past September.

It helped that MiHoYo, which was cofounded by Liu and two former college classmates in 2011, already had the smash hit Honkai series, so it wasn’t hard finding investors

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New approach to show how ghost-like neutrinos helped shape the Universe — ScienceDaily

Computer simulations have struggled to capture the impact of elusive particles called neutrinos on the formation and growth of the large-scale structure of the Universe. But now, a research team from Japan has developed a method that overcomes this hurdle.

In a study published this month in The Astrophysical Journal, researchers led by the University of Tsukuba present simulations that accurately depict the role of neutrinos in the evolution of the Universe.

Why are these simulations important? One key reason is that they can set constraints on a currently unknown quantity: the neutrino mass. If this quantity is set to a particular value in the simulations and the simulation results differ from observations, that value can be ruled out. However, the constraints can be trusted only if the simulations are accurate, which was not guaranteed in previous work. The team behind this latest research aimed to address this limitation.

“Earlier

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Dangerous ‘naked’ black holes could be hiding in the universe

Black holes are regions of infinite density, known as a singularity. And according to mainstream physics, each of these cosmic matter munchers is fringed by an event horizon –- a boundary where once you fall in, you never come out. 

But what if some black holes are naked — completely lacking such frontiers? As far as we can tell, singularities are always wrapped in event horizons, but a more detailed look at the math of general relativity suggests that doesn’t have to be the case. 

If such naked black holes dot the universe, new research reveals how we might be able to detect one: by looking at the ring of light surrounding it.

Related: What’s inside a black hole?

‘The Emperor Has No Clothes’

Black holes are a consequence of the mathematics of Einstein’s theory of general relativity. Those equations tell us that if a clump of matter collapses

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Scientists map ‘new atlas of the universe’



The new telescope has already mapped a million new galaxies


© CSIRO
The new telescope has already mapped a million new galaxies

Australian scientists say they have mapped a million new galaxies using an advanced telescope in the desert.

The CSIRO, the national science agency, said its new telescope had created “a new atlas of the universe” in record time – showing unprecedented detail.

It mapped three million galaxies in total, with pictures revealing twice the level of detail of previous surveys, the study said.

Astronomers hope the images will lead to new discoveries about the universe.

The CSIRO said the mapping took just 300 hours, whereas previous all-sky surveys had taken years.

With the data publicly available, scientists around the world would be able to study “everything from star formation to how galaxies and their super-massive black hole evolve and interact”, said lead author Dr David McConnell.

“We expect to find tens of millions of new galaxies in future

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Australian telescope maps new atlas of the universe in record speed | Astronomy

A powerful new telescope developed by Australian scientists has mapped three million galaxies in record speed, unlocking the universe’s deepest secrets.

The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (Askap) broke records as it conducted its first survey of the entire southern sky, mapping approximately three million galaxies in 300 hours.

Scientists used the telescope at an observatory in outback Western Australia to observe 83% of the sky.

The result is a new atlas of the universe, according to the telescope’s developer and operator, Australian science agency the CSIRO.

The survey – the Rapid Askap Continuum Survey – has mapped millions of star-like points; most are distant galaxies, the CSIRO says. About a million of those distant galaxies have never been seen before.

The CSIRO’s chief executive, Larry Marshall, said the survey had unlocked the deepest secrets of the universe.

“Askap is applying the very latest in science and technology to age-old

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How Did The Entire Universe Come From Nothing?

The more curious we get about the great cosmic unknowns, the more unanswered questions our investigations of the Universe will reveal. Inquiring about the nature of anything — where it is, where it came from, and how it came to be — will inevitably lead you to the same great mysteries: about the ultimate nature and origin of the Universe and everything in it. Yet, no matter how far back we go, those same lingering questions always seem

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For the first time, scientists detect the ghostly signal that reveals the engine of the universe

In research published Wednesday in the journal Nature, scientists reported that they’ve made the first detection of almost-ethereal particles called neutrinos that can be traced to carbon-nitrogen-oxygen fusion, known as the CNO cycle, inside the sun.

It’s a landmark finding that confirms theoretical predictions from the 1930s, and it’s being hailed as one of the greatest discoveries in physics of the new millenium.

“It’s really a breakthrough for solar and stellar physics,” said Gioacchino Ranucci of the Italian National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN), one of the researchers on the project since it began in 1990.

The scientists used the ultrasensitive Borexino detector at the INFN’s Gran Sasso particle physics laboratory in central Italy – the largest underground research center in the world, deep beneath the Apennine Mountains, about 65 miles northeast of Rome.

The detection caps off decades of study of the sun’s neutrinos by the Borexino project, and

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Blow your kid’s mind with the VR Universe and Bill Nye’s VR Science kit for the holidays

We’re inching closer to Thanksgiving, which means it’s about time to start thinking about holiday gifts. This year, you can give your kids the gift of science with fully immersive VR experiments. 



Professor Maxwell's VR Universe


© Provided by Space
Professor Maxwell’s VR Universe

Two of the coolest gifts for science or space-obsessed kids are Bill Nye’s Virtual Reality Science Kit ($60) and Professor Maxwell’s VR Universe ($50). Both science-based virtual reality experiences include VR goggles and a free mobile app that can be used on any smartphone to make kids feel like they’re floating in deep space or are exploring rocky caves, volcanoes, or waterfalls. 

Related: The best space gifts for kids 2020

Bill Nye’s VR Science Kit

Bill Nye (the Science Guy)’s kit lets kids join Bill in his virtual reality science lab. The kit includes an 80-page book that can be brought to life through the VR goggles, which teaches 30

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Making sense of a universe of corn genetics

Making sense of a universe of corn genetics
Seed banks across the globe store and preserve the genetic diversity of millions of varieties of crops, including corn. Iowa State University researchers are developing ways to predict the traits of corn varieties based on their genomes. Credit: Jianming Yu

Seed banks across the globe store and preserve the genetic diversity of millions of varieties of crops. This massive collection of genetic material ensures crop breeders access to a wealth of genetics with which to breed crops that yield better or resist stress and disease.


But, with a world of corn genetics at their disposal, how do plant breeders know which varieties are worth studying and which ones aren’t? For most of history, that required growing the varieties and studying their performance in the real world. But innovative data analytics and genomics could help plant breeders predict the performance of new varieties without having to go to the effort of

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