DOJ Sues Facebook, Alleging Discrimination Against American Workers | National News

The Trump administration is suing Facebook, alleging that the social media giant discriminated against American workers in the way it hired foreigners for high-paying positions.

A lawsuit filed Thursday by the Justice Department accuses Facebook of refusing to recruit or consider U.S workers for some 2,600 positions from January 2018 to September 2019, instead reserving those jobs for H-1B temporary work visa holders that the company sponsored for permanent residency, often known as a green card.

Federal law requires companies to demonstrate that there are no qualified U.S. workers for a position before it offers the job to a foreign worker on a temporary visa who the company can then sponsor for an employment-based green card.

DOJ alleges in its lawsuit that Facebook reserved those thousands of jobs for foreign workers it sponsored for green cards through a federal immigration process dubbed PERM. Facebook did not advertise the positions on

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The Trump administration in a new lawsuit accused Facebook of reserving over 2,600 high-paying jobs for foreign workers instead of hiring Americans



a man wearing a suit and tie: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg appears before a House Financial Services Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Andrew Harnik/AP


© Andrew Harnik/AP
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg appears before a House Financial Services Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2019. Andrew Harnik/AP

  • The Department of Justice has filed a lawsuit against Facebook, accusing the company of reserving over 2,600 high-paying jobs for foreign workers with temporary work visas instead of hiring US residents.
  • The lawsuit alleges that Facebook did not adequately advertise the positions before hiring foreign workers.
  • Trump administration officials have said they would stop foreign workers from taking jobs away from Americans.
  • The government blocked foreign H-1B holders from entering the country in June and proposed restrictions on H-1B visas in October.
  • Tech companies like Facebook largely hire skilled foreign workers and have pushed back on Trump’s H-1B restrictions as being harmful to the US economy.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The Department of Justice is suing Facebook, accusing the tech company

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Labor agency alleges Google illegally fired two workers who tried to organize

The company fired four employees last year in the wake of protests, but the NLRB only took up two of their cases. One of the said workers, Kathryn Spiers, added a pop-up notification to an internal version of Chrome that reminded her colleagues about their right to organize. At the time, Google said it “dismissed an employee who abused privileged access to modify an internal security tool.”

The other former Google employee named in the complaint, Laurence Berland, was fired after viewing his co-workers’ calendars. Google said it let Berland go over data security violations. Berland was involved in organizing against Google’s partnership with an anti-union consulting firm. If Google decides not to settle the complaint, the case will go before an administrative judge.

Google has faced other accusations of retaliating against employees who have organized protests and reported workplace issues. Workers have demonstrated over the company’s handling of sexual

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Google Hit With Surprise Labor Rights Complaint Over Fired Workers

File photo of Google’s main campus in Mountain View, California in 2019.

File photo of Google’s main campus in Mountain View, California in 2019.
Photo: Amy Osborne (Getty Images)

The National Labor Relations Board filed a surprise complaint on Wednesday accusing Google of illegally surveilling and firing two workers who had tried to form a union at the tech giant. What’s so surprising? The Trump administration isn’t exactly known as a defender of labor rights.

Google fired several employees in 2019 over what the company called in an internal memo, “clear and repeated violations of our data security policies.” Those policies included use of work calendar apps for protest organizing, a policy the NLRB says didn’t actually exist before they were fired according to the new complaint.

Two of the fired employees, Laurence Berland and Kathryn Spiers, have identified themselves as being named in the new complaint, though the copy that has been issued redacts many of the

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The US labor board accused Google of illegally spying on employee activists, firing them, and blocking workers from organizing



a person holding a sign: Tyler Sonnemaker/Business Insider


© Tyler Sonnemaker/Business Insider
Tyler Sonnemaker/Business Insider

  • The National Labor Relations Board on Wednesday filed a complaint accusing Google of violating several labor laws during a crackdown of worker activism last year.
  • The complaint said Google unlawfully terminated two employees involved in worker activism.
  • It also accused Google of violating US labor laws by monitoring and interrogating workers involved in the protests.
  • Five employees were fired late last year for their involvement in protests at the company. Two of those employees are mentioned in the complaint.
  • Are you a current or former Google insider? You can contact this reporter securely using the encrypted messaging app Signal (+1-628-228-1836) or encrypted email ([email protected]). Reach out using a nonwork device.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The National Labor Relations Board (NRLB) on Wednesday issued a complaint accusing Google of violating several labor laws during a crackdown on worker activism last year.

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Google broke labor law by retaliating against workers, federal agency alleges

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Laurence Berland, who was fired from Google, at a rally last year.


James Martin/CNET

A federal agency on Wednesday alleged that Google broke US labor laws by surveilling, interrogating and firing employees who organized protests against the search giant, according to a complaint filed by the National Labor Relations Board.

The filing addresses the firings Google workers including Laurence Berland and Kathryn Spiers, who were terminated by the search giant last year after the company said they had violated its internal policies. The NLRB complaint, however, alleges some of those policies are unlawful and that Google illegally questioned its employees about “protected concerted activities.”

Google on Wednesday defended the action it took against employees. “We strongly support the rights our employees have in the workplace, and open discussion and respectful debate have

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Google broke US labor law by spying on and firing workers, complaint alleges

google-hq-sede-mountain-view.jpg

Laurence Berland, who was fired from Google, at a rally last year.


James Martin/CNET

The National Labor Relations Board alleges Google broke US labor laws by surveilling and then firing employees who organized protests against the search giant, according to the Worker Agency, an advocacy firm that works on labor campaigns. 

The complaint by the NLRB, which was filed Wednesday, addresses the firings of Laurence Berland and Kathryn Spiers, the Worker Agency said. The pair were terminated by Google last year after the search giant said they had violated its policies. 

Some of those policies are unlawful, according to the NLRB complaint, which alleges Google has illegally interrogated and suspended workers. Details of the complaint were related by the Worker Agency, which worked with Berland, Spiers and Laurie Burgess, legal counsel

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Private spies reportedly infiltrated an Amazon strike, secretly taking photos of workers, trade unionists, and journalists. Now a union is taking legal action.



a person wearing sunglasses and standing in a parking lot: November 2018: An Amazon worker with a mask of Amazon founder Jeff Bezos posing during a strike on Black Friday in the main logistic center protesting demanding better working conditions. Marcos del Mazo/LightRocket via Getty Images


© Marcos del Mazo/LightRocket via Getty Images
November 2018: An Amazon worker with a mask of Amazon founder Jeff Bezos posing during a strike on Black Friday in the main logistic center protesting demanding better working conditions. Marcos del Mazo/LightRocket via Getty Images

  • Private spies sub-contracted by the infamous Pinkerton Agency, a firm Amazon employs, infiltrated and photographed a worker strike at a warehouse on Black Friday 2019, according to a Spanish media report.
  • The spies compiled a 51-page document, which included photos of trade unionists, workers, and journalists who attended the strike, Spanish news site El Diario reported.
  • Amazon has used Pinkerton spies to track warehouse workers and labor movements at the company in the past, according to a November report.
  • Spanish labor union CCOO has asked a judge to seize documentation relating to the report ahead of potential legal action against Amazon. An Amazon spokesperson told El Diario
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Amazon workers stage Black Friday protests in 15 countries

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Amazon has hired hundreds of thousands of new workers to handle the spike in consumer demand. 


Declan McCullagh/CNET
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A day after Amazon said it will give a holiday bonus to its front-line employees — those most at risk of contracting the coronavirus —  warehouse workers in multiple countries staged strikes and protests on Black Friday.

Full-time employees in the US from Dec. 1 to 31 are eligible for the $300 bonus, Dave Clark, Amazon’s senior vice president of retail operations, said Thursday in a company blog post. Part-time workers in the US employed during the same period will receive a $150 bonus, he said.

“Our teams are doing amazing work serving customers’

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Amazon workers and activism groups are staging Black Friday protests around the world, while the company tries to placate workers with $300 holiday bonuses



Garment workers in Bangladesh join the "Make Amazon Pay" protests on Black Friday, 2020. Sommilito Garment Sramik Federation


© Sommilito Garment Sramik Federation
Garment workers in Bangladesh join the “Make Amazon Pay” protests on Black Friday, 2020. Sommilito Garment Sramik Federation

  • A coalition of Amazon workers, unions, and activism groups began protesting against Amazon on Black Friday.
  • The “Make Amazon Pay group” gave the company a list of demands that included raising workers’ pay, putting an end to union-busting, and taking climate action. 
  • Amazon workers in Germany have downed tools and garment workers in Bangladesh are protesting outside a supplier. In the UK, a trade union called for a parliamentary inquiry into “dehumanizing” working conditions.
  • Amazon on Thursday said it would offer workers $150 to $300 holiday bonuses this year, but UNI Global Union chief, Christy Hoffman, told Business Insider this doesn’t go far enough.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

As Amazon gears up for one of its biggest shopping days of the year, thousands of

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