Are Customers Behaving Worse To Customer Service Employees In The Face Of Covid?

Are customers behaving worse toward the people who serve them, in the face of the Covid-spawned crisis we’re all living through? Or are customers actually getting easier to please and more empathetic to the plight of the businesses and the customer service employees with whom they interact?

The reality is that it’s going both ways. First, here’s what I’m seeing (in my work as a customer service consultant and turnaround expert), on the negative side: Some customers, being under stress themselves, have been taking that stress out on what they view as a safe target: customer service representatives they interact with from a distance rather than family members they know they’ll have to face again at the dinner table or in the marital bed.

Which is monumentally unfair, but there it is.

In addition, the bizarro and disheartening national divide on masks and other anti-pandemic safety precautions has led

Read More

Q3 smartphone sales better than earlier in the year but still worse than 2019

Gartner report finds that Xiaomi takes the #3 spot from Apple in worldwide vendor ranking for the first time.

1030download.jpg

Young woman using cell phone to send text message on social network at night. Closeup of hands with computer laptop in background

Diego Cervo, Getty Images/iStockphoto

Smartphone sales in the third quarter of 2020 were worse than Q3 2019 but better than Q2 of this year, according to Gartner. Smartphone sales were down 5.7% in Q3 of this year, which was an improvement over the 20% drop in Q2. People bought 366 million smartphones in the third quarter. 

Even new 5G smartphones and an easing of quarantine restrictions could not boost sales, according to Gartner.

“Consumers are limiting their discretionary spend even as some lockdown conditions have started to improve,” Anshul Gupta, senior research director at Gartner, said in a press release. “Global smartphone sales experienced moderate growth from the second

Read More

Apple’s app-security tech Gatekeeper caused all kinds of problems last week, but here’s why your Mac would be in far worse shape without it



a screenshot of a computer: macOS Big Sur. Apple


© Provided by Business Insider
macOS Big Sur. Apple

  • The surge of downloads for Apple’s latest version of macOS Big Sur caused an issue with Apple’s servers that triggered a bug in the company’s Gatekeeper.
  • Gatekeeper is the service that confirms that a piece of software is legitimate before it’s downloaded — when it stopped working, apps didn’t open.
  • Gatekeeper, and its failure, can be an annoyance for those who don’t want Apple regulating what they download, but most people would argue it’s better to be safe than sorry.
  • “Security always includes a tradeoff between convenience and protecting a user, sometimes from themselves,” says columnist Jason Aten.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Last week, as Apple users upgraded to the latest version of macOS Big Sur, the surge of downloads caused an issue with Apple’s servers that triggered a bug in the company’s Gatekeeper. That may not sound

Read More

These tiny, little-winged dinosaurs were probably worse at flying than chickens

The discovery of two small dinosaurs with bat-like wings a few years ago was a palaeontologist’s dream. Just how flight evolved in birds is something we’re still trying to nail down, and looking at this early evolution of bat-like wings in dinosaurs could give us a clue.  



a close up of a bird: A drawing of the theropod dinosaur Yi qi, which sported bat-like wings.


© Provided by Live Science
A drawing of the theropod dinosaur Yi qi, which sported bat-like wings.

But a team of researchers has now pointed out that just because you have wings, it doesn’t necessarily mean you’re actually any good at flying.

Loading...

Load Error

Yi qi and Ambopteryx longibrachium are two species of theropod dinosaurs that lived around 160 million years ago, both of which had unusually elongated fingers, and a skin membrane stretching between them, similar to a bat’s wing.

This is an entirely different kind of wing to the one theropod dinosaurs evolved to fly with – the dinosaurs that eventually

Read More

Globalized economy making water, energy and land insecurity worse: study

globalisation
Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain

The first large-scale study of the risks that countries face from dependence on water, energy and land resources has found that globalisation may be decreasing, rather than increasing, the security of global supply chains.


Countries meet their needs for goods and services through domestic production and international trade. As a result, countries place pressures on natural resources both within and beyond their borders.

Researchers from the University of Cambridge used macroeconomic data to quantify these pressures. They found that the vast majority of countries and industrial sectors are highly exposed both directly, via domestic production, and indirectly, via imports, to over-exploited and insecure water, energy and land resources. However, the researchers found that the greatest resource risk is due to international trade, mainly from remote countries.

The researchers are calling for an urgent enquiry into the scale and source of consumed goods and services, both in

Read More

‘We are out of time:’ Destructive wildfires in Colorado will grow worse as season lengthens, scientists warn

  • Wildfire season in Colorado would normally be nearing its end by now.
  • Instead, dry conditions fueled what’s now become the state’s largest wildfire in history.
  • The unusually late and intense fire season in Colorado is part of a larger problem of worsening destruction fueled by climate change.
  • The wildfire season in the West is now 78 days longer than it was in the 1970s, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.



a person is sitting in the snow: A firefighter is silhouetted as Cameron Peak Fire, the largest wildfire in Colorado's history, burns outside Drake, Colorado, U.S., October 17, 2020.


© Provided by CNBC
A firefighter is silhouetted as Cameron Peak Fire, the largest wildfire in Colorado’s history, burns outside Drake, Colorado, U.S., October 17, 2020.

Wildfire season in Colorado would normally be nearing its end by now. Instead, dry conditions fueled what’s now become the state’s largest wildfire in history.

The Cameron Peak fire, which ignited in August, is still raging through the state, burning more than 200,000 acres and further straining already an under-resourced emergency response grappling

Read More